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Recent Additions

History of American Religion, 1770-1930 (Uploaded: 10/4/2019)

The History of American Religion, 1770-1930 dataset allows users to examine historical change in religious and social measures in the United States from 1770 to 1930 using state-level historical data. Through the aid of U.S. Censuses, ICPSR, the American Presidency Project, and prominent religion scholars like Roger Finke and Rodney Stark, the file includes more than 290 historical variables that measure the religious adherence rates, population estimates, voting behavior, employment, and other social indicators over time.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2017 - Race and Ethnicity, All (Uploaded: 10/4/2019)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere.

The August 2013 and February 2017 Panel surveys both dealt with race and ethnicity, and the inclusion of a number of identical questions in the two surveys allows for analysis of change over time.

This dataset contains data from clergy, members and elders of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1991 (Uploaded: 10/4/2019)

This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering such topics as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations.

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 2005 (Uploaded: 10/4/2019)

The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 8, 2005, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2017 - Race and Ethnicity, Members and Elders (Uploaded: 10/4/2019)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere.

The August 2013 and February 2017 Panel surveys both dealt with race and ethnicity, and the inclusion of a number of identical questions in the two surveys allows for analysis of change over time.

This dataset contains data from members and elders of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2017 - Race and Ethnicity, Clergy (Uploaded: 10/4/2019)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere.

The August 2013 and February 2017 Panel surveys both dealt with race and ethnicity, and the inclusion of a number of identical questions in the two surveys allows for analysis of change over time.

This dataset contains data from clergy in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

General Social Survey, 2018 (Uploaded: 9/20/2019)

The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2018 GSS.

To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository.

Baylor Religion Survey, Wave IV (2014) (Uploaded: 6/21/2019)

Wave IV of the Baylor Religion Survey (2014), also known as "The Values and Beliefs of the American Public - A National Study," was administered by Gallup and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. It covers topics of religious behaviors and attitudes; morality, gender roles, and politics; family and religiosity; sexual orientation; work; race and ethnicity; guns and society; surveillance; science and the supernatural; and basic demographics.

Global Restrictions on Religion, 2007-2016 (Uploaded: 6/21/2019)

In December 2009, Pew Research Center released “Global Restrictions on Religion,” the first in a series of annual reports on a data-coding project that seeks to measure levels of government restrictions on religion and social hostilities involving religion around the world.

The reports use two indexes to rate nearly 200 countries and self-governing territories on their levels of restrictions and hostilities. The Government Restrictions Index (GRI) is based on 20 indicators of ways that national and local governments restrict religion, including through coercion and force. The Social Hostilities Index (SHI) is based on 13 indicators of ways in which private individuals and social groups infringe upon religious beliefs and practices, including religiously biased crimes, mob violence and efforts to stop particular religious groups from growing or operating. The reports include data on the number and types of documented incidents of religion-related violence, including terrorism and armed conflict.

As of June 2018, Pew Research had published nine reports on global restrictions on religion, analyzing a total of 10 years’ worth of data (the first two reports covered a total of three years, from 2007 to 2009). The data are presented as a semiwide-format dataset, in which each row is a country-year observation (for example, “Afghanistan, 2007”). The columns contain all of the variables presented in Pew Research Center’s annual reports on restrictions on religion, as well as some additional variables analyzed in separate studies. The dataset currently contains data from 2007 through 2016.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, July 2015 - Awareness and Understanding of the Presbyterian Mission Agency, All (Uploaded: 6/21/2019)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere.

"In 2014, the Presbyterian Mission Agency began a new process for setting goals and assessing impact. This panel study is intended to establish a baseline for future assessments of the Communications Department of the Presbyterian Mission Agency, and is part of a larger impact assessment for the department." Awareness and Understanding of the Presbyterian Mission Agency: 2016 Presbyterian Panel Survey

This dataset contains data from clergy, members and elders of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

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