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Recent Additions

General Social Survey, 2018 - Instructional Dataset (Uploaded: 3/23/2020)

This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2018 General Social Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies.

To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository.

National Survey of Congregational Crime and Security 2015 (Uploaded: 3/23/2020)

The Survey Research Center (SRC) was asked to administer the National Survey of Congregational Crime and Security to religious congregations throughout the United States. Surveys were mailed to congregations in paper and pencil form, with the option to submit a web version of the survey if they preferred.

Religious Freedom Index: American Perspectives on the First Amendment (Uploaded: 3/23/2020)

The Religious Freedom Index survey is designed to capture how the American opinion has changed on religious liberty. Questions assess how Americans answer questions relating to religious liberty protections in light of America's shrinking religious atmosphere (based on the polls). These questions focus on covering a wide spectrum of religious liberty protections under the First Amendment, including: 1) Religious Pluralism; 2) Religion and Policy; 3) Religious Sharing; 4) Religion in Society; 5) Church and State; and 6) Religion in Action.

Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS) (Uploaded: 2/28/2020)

CILS is a longitudinal study designed to study the adaptation process of the immigrant second generation, which is defined broadly as U.S.-born children with at least one foreign-born parent or child born abroad but brought at an early age to the United States. Immigrant families, children's own demographic characteristics, language use, self-identities, and academic attainment were key objectives. Questions about religion were asked only once, in Survey Wave 3 (variables V439 through V440).

Religion and Rule of Law (Uploaded: 2/28/2020)

The "Religion and Rule of Law" data set was assembled from multiple data sources to aid the study of connections between religion, corruption, and the rule of law. In the resulting data file, each of the 236 cases represents a country or territory. The data file includes basic country identifiers, governance variables, religious tradition variables, demographic and developmental variables, and geography variables.

Indices regarding the rule of law and the level of corruption were generated based on the World Bank's Governance Research Indicators Country Snapshot (GRICS) data set (Kaufman, Kraay, and Mastuzzi 2005). Data on the GDP per capita in constant PPP dollars and related variables are based on data from the CIA's World Factbook 2003. In addition, data on each country's largest religious groups in the years 1900 and 2000 stem from Barrett, Kurian, and Johnson (2001). Sources for all variables are shown in the attached PDF codebook.

The Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2017 (Uploaded: 2/28/2020)

The Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2017 was a cooperative research endeavor, organized by the Paul B. Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics at Calvin College, that focused on the social characteristics, theological beliefs, civic endeavors, and political attitudes and behavior of American clergy. The project was a cooperative endeavor, with different participants examining clergy from a specific denomination, generally a denomination of which they were either a part of or with which they were very familiar. The group utilized a common questionnaire, which largely replicated the questionnaire used in the Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2001 and 2009 (the data for which are also housed at ARDA). Participants funded the data collection and data entry costs related to their particular denomination they surveyed, with the data from each denomination or faith tradition then being pooled together to create a combined data file.

In the end, 2,502 clergy from the following denominations were surveyed: the Assemblies of God (AOG); the Christian Reformed Church in North American (CRC); the Disciples of Christ (DOC); the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA); the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod (LCMS); the Mennonite Church, USA; the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. (PCUSA); the Reformed Church in America (RCA); the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC); and, the United Methodist Church (UMC). Those participating in the project mailed the questionnaire to a random sample of clergy from the denomination they chose to study. The sample size varied from denomination to denomination, with larger denominations generally having larger sample sizes. The response rate varied by denomination, with smaller denominations generally having higher response rates. Details related to those researching each denomination are presented below.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2014 - 1001 New Worshiping Communities, All (Uploaded: 2/28/2020)

The Presbyterian Panel consists of three nationally representative samples of groups affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.): members, ruling elders serving on session, and teaching elders. (The session is the governing board in Presbyterian congregations.) New samples are drawn every three years. Panel surveys are conducted quarterly, primarily by mail, but with an online completion option.

The Panel is maintained and directed by the office of Research Services, part of the Presbyterian Mission Agency of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The first Panel was created in 1973 to provide a means for informing denominational leaders of the opinions and activities of the rank and file across the church. Survey topics and questions are usually developed at the request of, and in consultation with, staff or elected members of national church entities. However, ultimate decisions on content of Panel surveys and the disposition of Panel data are those of Research Services. Standards developed by the American Association of Public Opinion Research guide Panel surveys.

The current survey is the ninth survey completed by the 2012-2014 Panel, and was distributed in April of 2014. The survey looks at familiarity with the 1001 New Worshiping Communities Initiative and awareness of new worshiping communities. This dataset contains responses from members, elders, and clergy.

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2016 (Uploaded: 2/28/2020)

The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor change in quality of life. The survey covers topics including environment, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2016 NASIS more specifically gauges opinions about natural resources, youth and community, food and health, Eastern Redcedar, drug use, homelessness, engineering, gambling, and transportation.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2014 - 1001 New Worshiping Communities, Clergy (Uploaded: 2/28/2020)

The Presbyterian Panel consists of three nationally representative samples of groups affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.): members, ruling elders serving on session, and teaching elders. (The session is the governing board in Presbyterian congregations.) New samples are drawn every three years. Panel surveys are conducted quarterly, primarily by mail, but with an online completion option.

The Panel is maintained and directed by the office of Research Services, part of the Presbyterian Mission Agency of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The first Panel was created in 1973 to provide a means for informing denominational leaders of the opinions and activities of the rank and file across the church. Survey topics and questions are usually developed at the request of, and in consultation with, staff or elected members of national church entities. However, ultimate decisions on content of Panel surveys and the disposition of Panel data are those of Research Services. Standards developed by the American Association of Public Opinion Research guide Panel surveys.

The current survey is the ninth survey completed by the 2012-2014 Panel, and was distributed in April of 2014. The survey looks at familiarity with the 1001 New Worshiping Communities Initiative and awareness of new worshiping communities. This dataset contains responses from clergy.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2014 - 1001 New Worshiping Communities, Members and Elders (Uploaded: 2/28/2020)

The Presbyterian Panel consists of three nationally representative samples of groups affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.): members, ruling elders serving on session, and teaching elders. (The session is the governing board in Presbyterian congregations.) New samples are drawn every three years. Panel surveys are conducted quarterly, primarily by mail, but with an online completion option.

The Panel is maintained and directed by the office of Research Services, part of the Presbyterian Mission Agency of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The first Panel was created in 1973 to provide a means for informing denominational leaders of the opinions and activities of the rank and file across the church. Survey topics and questions are usually developed at the request of, and in consultation with, staff or elected members of national church entities. However, ultimate decisions on content of Panel surveys and the disposition of Panel data are those of Research Services. Standards developed by the American Association of Public Opinion Research guide Panel surveys.

The current survey is the ninth survey completed by the 2012-2014 Panel, and was distributed in April of 2014. The survey looks at familiarity with the 1001 New Worshiping Communities Initiative and awareness of new worshiping communities. This dataset contains responses from members and elders.

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