Religion and Politics Survey, 2000

Data Archive > U.S. Surveys > General Population > National > Other > Summary


The religion and politics survey is part of the larger Public Role of Mainline Protestantism Project, which is coordinated through Princeton University's Survey Research Center. The survey addresses respondents' views on political, social, and religious issues, their political actions, beliefs, and affiliations, and their religious actions, beliefs, and affiliations.

Data File
Cases: 5,603
Variables: 144
Weight Variable: WEIGHT1, WEIGHT2, and WEIGHT3
Data Collection
Date Collected: between January 6 and March 31, 2000
Funded By
The Pew Charitable Trusts
Collection Procedures
Telephone interviews
Sampling Procedures
Random generation of the last two digits of telephone numbers selected on the basis of their area code, telephone exchange (the first three digits of a seven digit telephone number), and bank number (the fourth and fifth digits) ensure equal representation of all (listed and unlisted) residential households. The area code, telephone exchange, and bank number were selected proportionally by county and by telephone exchange within county. There were at least ten attempts to reach each sampled phone number and the person over eighteen with the most recent birthday was asked to participate in the interview.
Principal Investigators
Robert Wuthnow
Related Publications
Robert Wuthnow and John H. Evans (eds.). The Quiet Hand of God: Faith Based Activism and Mainline Protestantism. (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2002).
Notes
WEIGHT1 adjusts for demographic distributions that may be skewed due to phone interview. WEIGHT2 adjusts for the respondent's probability of selection based on the number of adults in the household and the number of phone lines in the household used to receive calls. WEIGHT3 multiplies WEIGHT1 by a factor to yield the true number of cases (5,603).