Religion and America's Role in the World

Data Archive > U.S. Surveys > General Population > National > News Polls > Summary


"Since 9/11, America’s role in the world has taken on an increasingly important part of our political discourse. Questions about the use of military force, commitments to nation building, the war on terrorism, humanitarian disaster relief, women’s rights around the world, as well as our relations with other nations have sparked heated debates from the halls of Congress to college dorm rooms. People’s views are informed by their values and personal experiences, as well as international events. While these values and experiences are relatively well understood, the influence of religious identity and engagement has not been explored in-depth. In this first major study of religion and international affairs, we explore the role that religious worldviews play in shaping views about America’s role in the world and foreign policy priorities."

Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research (2008). "Religion and America's Role in the World." Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, p. 2.

Data File
Cases: 1,400
Variables: 114
Weight Variable: WEIGHT
Data Collection
Date Collected: September 4-21, 2008
Funded By
Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly and the United Nations Foundation
Collection Procedures
"Greenberg Quinlan Rosner designed and administered this survey for Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly and the United Nations Foundation. The survey reached a total of 1400 adults, 18 years or older, including an oversample of 400 evangelical Christians ages 18-29. The survey was conducted September 4-21, 2008. The margin of error is +/- 3.1 percent for the total survey sample. Evangelical Christians are defined as Protestants or members of another Christian religion who identify as fundamentalist, evangelical, charismatic, or Pentecostal, or who indicated they are born-again Christians."

Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research (2008). "Religion and America's Role in the World." Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, p. 23.
Sampling Procedures
"Telephone numbers for the 1000 adult respondents in the base sample were generated by a random digit dial process, thereby allowing access to all listed and unlisted phones, and interviews were conducted by professional interviewers. The oversample of young evangelical Christians employed a multi-modal design. One hundred of the young evangelical Christians in the oversample were reached using an age-predicted random digit dial process and interviewed over the telephone by professional interviewers. The remaining 300 young evangelical Christians in the oversample were drawn from an opt-in web panel that is designed to be demographically representative at a national level. However, Internet panels, like this one, use non-probability based sampling methods, by necessity, and these results need to be considered with that limitation in mind."

Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research (2008). "Religion and America's Role in the World." Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, p. 23.
Principal Investigators
Anna Greenberg, Senior Vice President at Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research

Jessica Keating, Analyst

Khady Mbaye, Project Associate
Related Publications
As of October 22, 2008, Religion and Ethics Newsweekly offered a summary of the study, as well as links to the comprehensive report and the questionnaire, on this webpage:
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/episodes/by-topic/civil-society/religion-ethics-newsweeklyun-foundation-survey-explores-religion-and-americas-role-in-the-world/1190/
Note 1
The variables INTCOE1, INTCOE2, and INTCOE3 are coded from an open-ended question: "Thinking internationally, what do you believe is the biggest problem facing the world today?" Respondents were not given answer categories, but gave any answer they wished, which was then coded by the researchers into the categories given. In the event that a response fit two or three categories, it was coded in INTCOE2 or INTCOE3 as applicable.
Note 2
For the variables REGION and GQRURB, the phone survey respondents' location was coded from federal information processing standards into the respective variables. Internet survey respondents were asked their state/county of residence, and the code was generated from that response.

Greenberg Quinlan Rosner define urban/rural categories as follows:

"Large Metro" is a county that includes the central city of a Metropolitan Statistical Area(MSA), as defined in the 2000 census, with a population greater than one million.

"Small Metro" is a county that includes the central city of an MSA with a population of less than one million, or has a county that includes a secondary city with an MSA of more than one million.

"Suburban" is a county that is in an MSA, does not include a central city, and has a population density greater than 400 persons per square mile, or a total population greater than 300,000.

"Fringe" is a county that is in an MSA, does not include a central city, and has a population density less than 400 persons per square mile and a total population of less than 300,000.

"Rural" is any county that is not in a metropolitan statistical area.