State of the First Amendment Survey, 2003

Data Archive > U.S. Surveys > General Population > National > State of the First Amendment > Summary


The State of the First Amendment survey, conducted annually (since 1997, except for 1998) for the First Amendment Center by the Center for Survey Research and Analysis at the University of Connecticut, examines public attitudes toward the freedoms of speech, press, and religion and the rights of assembly and petition. Core questions asked each year include: awareness of First Amendment freedoms, overall assessments of whether there is too much or too little freedom of speech, press, and religion in the United States, levels of tolerance for various types of public expression (such as flag-burning and singing songs with potentially offensive lyrics), levels of tolerance for various journalistic behaviors, attitudes toward prayer in schools, and level of support for amending the Constitution to prohibit flag-burning or defacement. Additional (non-core) questions asked in the 2003 survey include attitudes toward corporate ownership of news organizations, media coverage of the Iraq War and "the war on terrorism," whether the government has the right to monitor the activities of religious groups even if it means infringing upon religious freedoms, and whether controversial political remarks by entertainers affect the likelihood of attending performances or purchasing products featuring such entertainers.

Data File
Cases: 1,000
Variables: 96
Weight Variable: None
Data Collection
Date Collected: June 3 to June 15, 2003.
Funded By
Freedom Forum
American Journalism Review
Collection Procedures
Computer-aided telephone interview surveys.
Sampling Procedures
The Center for Survey Research and Analysis at the University of Connecticut conducted a total of 1,000 telephone interviews with a random national sample of adults ages 18 and over, between June 3 and June 15, 2003.
Principal Investigators
Center for Survey Research and Analysis, University of Connecticut and the First Amendment Center