Other Religious Groups

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Faith Communities Today Survey (FACT) 2010, Orthodox Parishes (2010)

The Faith Communities Today 2010 national survey brings together 26 individual surveys of congregations. Twenty-four were conducted by or for partner denominations and faith groups, representing 32 of the country’s largest denominations and traditions. The common core questionnaire of the survey replicates more than 150 questions from the 2000, 2005 and 2008 surveys, plus a special section on the 2008 recession.

Three major Orthodox Church bodies were involved in the FACT 2010 survey: the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America (GOA), Orthodox Church in America (OCA) and Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese (AOCA). Combined, these three Orthodox Church bodies account for 70 percent of all U.S. Orthodox Christian parishes and 80 percent of Orthodox Church adherents.

Faith Communities Today Survey (FACT) 2010, Assemblies of God (2010)

The Faith Communities Today 2010 national survey brings together 26 individual surveys of congregations. Twenty-four were conducted by or for partner denominations and faith groups, representing 32 of the country’s largest denominations and traditions. The common core questionnaire of the survey replicates more than 150 questions from the 2000, 2005 and 2008 surveys, plus a special section on the 2008 recession. This dataset contains the FACT 2010 data from the Assemblies of God.

Survey of Attenders: International UFO Congress Convention and Film Festival, 2010 (2010)

The International UFO Congress (IUFOC) is an organization with the goal of broadly disseminating “UFO and related information worldwide.” From February 21-27, 2010, the IUFOC held a UFO Convention and Film Festival at the Aquarius Casino Resort in Laughlin, Nevada. The principal investigators were given permission by the IUFOC board to conduct an anonymous survey of conference attenders.

The survey includes items about UFO beliefs, theories about the nature of the UFO phenomenon, UFO experiences and beliefs about government conspiracies related to UFOs. The survey also includes items related to non-UFO paranormal beliefs and experiences, items related to conventional religion and a battery of demographic questions.

Survey of Attenders: Texas Bigfoot Research Conservancy Annual Meeting, 2009 (2009)

The Texas Bigfoot Research Conservancy (TBRC) is a Texas-based, non-profit organization composed of volunteer investigators with the mission of attempting to find proof of the existence of Bigfoot. As stated on the TBRC website, the TBRC believes that Bigfoot is a biological entity, “probably an unlisted large primate.” The TBRC is funded by membership dues, fundraisers and the proceeds from an annual conference in which the TBRC invites other Bigfoot researchers and the general public to hear lectures on the latest evidence and sightings related to Bigfoot.

The PIs attended the September 26, 2009 annual conference of the TBRC in Tyler, Texas. With the permission of the TBRC leadership, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to attendees as they registered for the conference. The questionnaire includes questions related to beliefs about Bigfoot, experiences with Bigfoot, the validity of current evidence for Bigfoot, and the manner in which respondents first became interested in the subject. The survey includes demographic information and also asks respondents a series of questions about religiosity and questions about paranormal beliefs and experiences not directly related to Bigfoot.

Clergy and Retirement: An Exploratory Study on Housing and Financial Preparedness (2008)

This study explored the financial and housing options that will be available to clergy members of a nondenominational fellowship when they reach the age of retirement. The Church of Christ is a Protestant fellowship that emphasizes the autonomy of the local congregation and does not have a regional or national body to organize a church-sponsored retirement plan. Thus, each minister is primarily responsible for his own retirement, which may or may not include assistance from the local congregation.

The Orthodox Church Today: A National Study of Parishioners and the Realities of the Orthodox Parish Life in the USA (2007)

The survey and the study focused on personal social and religious attitudes of American Orthodox Christians and on the patterns of the everyday church life in their local parishes. Special attention was paid to the “image” of the Orthodox clergy through the eyes of the “people in the pews” and to the issues dealing with “Democracy and Pluralism in the Church,” “Changes and Innovations in the Church,” and “Religious ‘Particularism’ and Ecumenism.” Numerous comparisons with the US Roman Catholics and Protestants make study results especially interesting for the wider audience.

Muslim American Survey, 2007 (2007)

In 2007, the Pew Research Center conducted what is believed to be the first-ever national telephone survey of a probability sample of Muslim Americans, a rare, dispersed, and highly diverse population. The study examined the political and social values, religious beliefs and practices, and life experiences of Muslims living in the U.S. today. The survey also contrasts the views of the Muslim population as a whole with those of the U.S. general population, and with the attitudes of Muslims all around the world, including Western Europe. Finally, findings from the survey make important contributions to the debate over the total size of the Muslim American population.

Kent County Congregations Study, 2007 (2007)

Drawing on extensive prior research that explored the relationship between congregations and social welfare, the KCCS had four objectives: (1) to document the social and educational services that Kent County, Michigan congregations actually provide; (2) to collect demographic and contextual information about religious leaders, congregations, and their civic and community engagement; (3) to facilitate comparison of Kent County to the nation; and (4) to estimate the “replacement value” of the top three social or educational services provided by each congregation.

A broad group of religious leaders and academic advisors gave their input to the KCCS. Researchers from the Calvin College Center for Social Research, the Grand Valley State University Community Research Institute, and the Douglas and Maria DeVos Foundation at RDV Corporation conducted the study in two phases from mid-2006 to late 2007. First, the research team undertook a comprehensive census of Kent County congregations and second they surveyed congregational leaders in face-to-face and telephone interviews.

Demographics in U.S. Congregations Survey, Parishioners (2006)

This survey contains a variety of measures on the following: congregational participation; why one chose to attend his or her congregation; congregational switching; conversion experiences; social networks and context; views concerning social problems; social embeddedness in one's congregation; private devotional activity; higher education; religious beliefs; social attitudes; demographic information. Participants are parishioners in Assemblies of God, Episcopal, and United Methodist congregations in three locations: Hartford, CT; Grand Rapids, MI; Waco, TX.

Demographics in U.S. Congregations Survey, Pastors (2006)

This survey contains a variety of measures on the following: Congregational characteristics; community change surrounding the congregation; interaction with other congregations; congregational emphases; content of worship services; demographic characteristics of congregants; church leadership; and theological beliefs. Participants are pastors in Assemblies of God, Episcopal, and United Methodist congregations in three locations: Hartford, CT; Grand Rapids, MI; Waco, TX.

Evolving Visions of the Orthodox Priesthood in America: A National Study of the Orthodox Parish Clergy in the USA (2006)

The study focused on four aspects of priesthood: 1) Sources of satisfaction in the work of an Orthodox priest in America; 2) Challenges and problems that parish clergy face; 3) Sources of support that the Orthodox priests can rely upon if necessary; 4) Issues in the life of the Church that Orthodox priests believe should be urgently and openly discussed.
In addition, the survey also examined clergy approaches to the four subjects that are frequently debated in the Orthodox community in America: 1) Notion of priesthood and status of a priest; 2) Democracy and openness in the Church; 3) Changes and innovations in the Orthodox Church; 4) Ecumenical attitudes and relations to the outside non-Orthodox community.

Reformed Church in America Denominational Membership Data, 1818-2000 (2002)

This file contains information on all congregations in the Reformed Church in America (RCA) from 1818 to 2000. The data are from the “Orange Book” directories of the RCA. They include all information that is recorded there for each congregation, from ministers’ names to “total contributions.” Churches are identified by name, with a deliberate attempt to include multiple names where applicable. Also included are the city, classis(es), synod(s), and county where the church is located. Annual national fertility rates are included on each church’s records, as are decadal U.S. population and Consumer Price Index figures.

Exploring Religious America, 2002 (2002)

The purpose of the Exploring Religious America survey was to examine the extent of the nation's tolerance of religious diversity, familiarity with different faiths, and views on Islam, extremism and future conflict -especially in the aftermath of September 11th. The survey was part of a series of five special programs airing on the Public Broadcasting Service television program Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, and it was the subject of a cover story in U.S. News & World Report. The series, which began on April 26, 2002, also examined broader questions about the role of religious beliefs and experiences in the U.S. As of July 7, 2003, a summary of the poll and survey results for the Exploring Religious America could be found at: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/week534/specialreport.html.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, 2001, United Church of Christ, Attenders (2001)

“Over 300,000 worshipers in over 2,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey—-making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an Attendee survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend of April 29, 2001; (b) a Congregational Profile describing the congregation’s facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a Leader Survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America.” (From Appendix 1, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations: Who’s Going Where and Why. U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology.) This data file contains data for the United Church of Christ random sample Attenders only. The Congregational Life Survey also has a Congregational profile for the United Church of Christ congregations and a Leader survey of the United Church of Christ leaders.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, 2001, United Church of Christ, Leaders (2001)

“Over 300,000 worshipers in over 2,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey—-making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an Attendee survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend of April 29, 2001; (b) a Congregational Profile describing the congregation’s facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a Leader Survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America.” (From Appendix 1, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations: Who’s Going Where and Why. U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology.) This data file contains data for the United Church of Christ Leaders from the random sample of United Church of Christ congregations. The Congregational Life Survey also has a Congregational profile for the United Church of Christ congregations and an Attender survey of the United Church of Christ worshipers.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, 2001, United Church of Christ, Profile (2001)

“Over 300,000 worshipers in over 2,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey—-making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an Attendee survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend of April 29, 2001; (b) a Congregational Profile describing the congregation’s facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a Leader Survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America.” (From Appendix 1, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations: Who’s Going Where and Why. U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology.) This data file contains data from the Congregational Profile for the United Church of Christ congregations. The Congregational Life Survey also has a Leader survey of the United Church of Christ leaders and an Attender survey of the United Church of Christ worshipers.

The Cooperative Clergy Study Project (2001)

The Cooperative Clergy Research Project is an endeavor initiated and coordinated through the efforts of the Henry Institute. A variety of scholars from different denominational backgrounds collaborated to develop a questionnaire that would examine political beliefs, political involvement, community involvement, and religious beliefs of clergy. While this cooperative research effort builds on previous research related to the political role of the clergy, this effort is distinctively different due to the large number of scholars working on this project, the large number of denominations included in the study, and the large number of clergy that participated.

ELCA-Episcopal Church Study, 1999-2000 (2000)

The ELCA/Episcopal Church study proceeded from the belief that we must capture as many aspects of congregational life as possible in order to evaluate the political salience of the diverse information sources within the church environment. The congregant survey paralleled the clergy survey, asking a wide range of questions about members’ congregation, clergy and political behavior, including political motivation and partisanship, civic skill practice, social recruitment into politics and political participation. The survey also asked about social theology, issue importance, group involvement, political opinions, voting behavior and demographics, among other topics.

Survey of Clergy in Indianapolis, 2000 (2000)

The purpose of this study was to learn about the role local clergy and their congregations play in shaping community life in Indianapolis and the extent of the clergy's active involvement in neighborhood and community affairs. The study also was designed to collect descriptive data regarding the characteristics, attitudes, religious beliefs and practices, and professional activities of Christian clergy in the city.

Forgiveness Survey, 1999 (1999)

This is a survey of American adults who are involved in small groups using religious activities in their programs or having activities that may be related to forgiveness. The study was designed by Princeton University professor Robert Wuthnow and conducted by the Gallup Organization in Princeton, New Jersey. Questions focus on a range of potential consequences and correlates of engaging in forgiveness behavior, including group activities, emotional well-being, pro-social and civic behavior, overcoming addictions, and many other issues related to groups and forgiveness.

Spirituality and the Elderly: Survey of Staff and Residents From Long-Term Care Facilities, 1998 (1998)

"This study compared staff and resident knowledge, attitudes and practices related to religious expression in long-term care settings. Staff and residents from 13 facilities and organizations providing services to long-term care staff completed a survey related to religion and spirituality in long-term care" (Walker et al. August 1998).

ELCA-Episcopal Church Clergy Study, 1998 (1998)

The data come from a random national sample of 1,339 ELCA pastors and 901 Episcopal priests and deacons who responded to an extensive mail survey in the summer and fall of 1998. A second wave was sent two months after the first survey; second-wave respondents did not differ in significant ways from first-wave respondents. The authors’ personal affiliation with an ELCA-affiliated college (which was disclosed to survey recipients on the survey’s cover page) almost certainly accounts for the considerably higher response rate from ELCA pastors. This extensive survey with more than 350 individual questions captures essential information about clergy, their congregations, and aspects of the local community.

The survey asked a broad range of questions about their personal backgrounds and their theological orientations. It asked about the frequency and means by which they present political messages and take political actions within and beyond their congregations. It also asked about their personal political attitudes and actions. The survey also gained information about how their congregations compare with others in the local community and in the denomination. It also gained information about how often and in what ways clergy interact with their community and denominational clergy colleagues. Finally, clergy offered their views on denominational organizations and issues. They told us what political and religious information sources they used on a regular basis.

SGI-USA Membership Survey, 1997 (1997)

After the success of a survey of British Soka Gakkai, a Japanese based religion (a form of Buddhism), a counterpart survey in the United States was undertaken. Many of the items included in the U.S. survey (SGIUSA) reproduced questions from the National Opinion Research Center's General Social Survey (GSS), making direct comparisons possible between members of Soka Gakkai and the general American public. Other questions reproduced items included in the survey of SGI members in the United Kingdom. Consequently, this survey provides one of the most comprehensive surveys of an alternative religion in the United States, a survey which is comparable to both a similar sample in the United Kingdom and the general population of the United States.

Endtime Family (Children of God), 1997 (1997)

The Endtime Family, or Children of God, data set is an examination of a religious group that is in high tension with its surrounding environment. This data set assesses the validity of applying survey data techniques to high tension religious groups. Additionally, most of the variables are replications of variables from the General Social Survey (GSS) and some variables are replications from the International Social Survey Program, enabling comparisons between the Endtime Family and the general population.

Clergy Job Satisfaction Survey, 1996 (1996)

This dataset is a 1996 national survey of parish ministers from two Protestant denominations that both have open labor market structures: the United Church of Christ and the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). The survey was intended to examine sources of job satisfaction and employee attachment for clergy employed in parish ministry.

ETS Exiting Survey, 1995-1996 (1996)

This study was conducted to gather information on graduating students and was designed with the active participation of the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). Administered just prior to graduation, the exit instrument was aimed specifically at assessing student satisfaction. In addition, student's personal and theological views as well as future plans were among the included items. Approximately 50 seminaries used this instrument to survey their graduates. Presbyterian and United Methodist seminaries are well represented as are the university-related schools.

ETS Entering Survey, 1994 (1994)

This survey was designed with active participation of the directors of admissions from university-based divinity schools as a way to evaluate the success of certain strategies in their recruiting efforts and the role of financial aid in the student's decision-making process. Between 1992 and 1994, some 50 seminaries used this instrument to survey their incoming students. Presbyterian and United Methodist seminaries are well represented as are the university-related divinity schools.

Ritual Abuse Survivors in the United States, 1994 (1994)

Beginning in the 1980s claims of “Satanic ritual abuse” received considerable attention in the popular media. Ritual abuse survivors claim to have been physically and sexually molested by secretive, underground groups of Satanists. Many ritual abuse survivors further claim that Satanists have the ability to erase memories of their abuse. Hence, survivors often attempt to recover “repressed” memories of ritual abuse with the help of therapists. With the spread of ritual abuse claims in the 1990s, dozens of therapists began to specialize in the subject.

In 1994 the principal investigator conducted an anonymous survey of ritual abuse survivors. In addition to questions about the survivors’ abuse history, the survey included items designed to reproduce Bennett’s Past Month Isolation Scale (PMI) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). A set of demographic questions asked respondents about their gender, age, occupation, income, education, race and marital status.

Ritual abuse survivors are difficult to survey. A common theme in the therapeutic literature about ritual abuse is the constant danger posed by the Satanic cults that survivors claim to have escaped. The ritual abuse literature reports that Satanists will use “triggers” to lure the survivor back into the cult, or may try to kill the survivor should his or her memories threaten the group. Thus, survivors and their therapists display considerable reticence about talking to outsiders regarding their claimed experiences. To our knowledge this release represents the first publicly available data on this controversial movement.

American Congregational Giving Study, Member Questionnaires, 1993 (1993)

No church is entirely satisfied with the level of financial support that it receives from its members. For this reason, the Lilly Endowment commissioned a nation-wide study of giving in U.S. churches, which came to be known as the American Congregational Giving Study. One aspect was a five denomination study of church members which included: Assemblies of God, Southern Baptist Convention, Roman Catholic Church, Evangelical Lutheran Church of America and the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). A total of 30 households from each of the 125 congregations were studied.

The congregations were chosen from nine sampling regions, one in each of the nine U.S. census regions. Field workers personally visited each congregation in the sample. They had two tasks. First, they assisted the pastor in the completion of a Congregational Profile, which summarized the major socioeconomic characteristics, beliefs, programs and finances of the congregation. Second, they selected a random sample of 30 congregation members. Each of these was sent a Lay Questionnaire, which asked members about their personal religious beliefs, opinions about both their congregation and denomination and their personal socioeconomic characteristics. The data were collected into two separate data files, one containing the congregational profiles (ACGSCONG) and the other containing the responses from the member questionnaires (ACGSMBRS). The data from each congregational profile and that congregation's member questionnaires are easily merged through their common congregational id (Variable name CONGID).

New Evangelical Movement Congregations, Downey, California, 1993 (1993)

This survey of Calvary Chapel Downey participants was part of a large research grant from the Lilly Endowment to study rapidly growing non-mainline churches. Calvary Chapel Downey (Downey, CA) was one of four non-mainline churches surveyed.

American Congregational Giving Study, Gallup Poll, 1993 (1993)

No church is entirely satisfied with the level of financial support it receives from its members. For this reason, the Lilly Endowment commissioned a nation-wide study of giving in U.S. churches, which came to be known as the American Congregational Giving Study. One aspect consisted of a telephone survey of 1,002 U.S. church members. Three denominations were chosen to be studied: the Southern Baptist Convention, the Roman Catholic Church, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. Respondents were asked about their attitudes toward their denomination and congregation, their personal religious beliefs, their religious contributions and their socioeconomic status.

New Evangelical Movement Congregations, Pastors Survey, 1992 (1992)

This survey was part of a large research grant from the Lilly Endowment, Inc. to study rapidly growing non-mainline churches. Vineyard and Calvary Chapel North American and International pastors were surveyed in order to understand the growth of new evangelical movements.

New Evangelical Movement Congregations, Anaheim, California, 1992 (1992)

This survey of Vineyard Anaheim participants was part of a large research grant from the Lilly Endowment to study rapidly growing non-mainline churches. Vineyard Anaheim (Anaheim, California) was one of four non-mainline churches surveyed.

New Evangelical Movement Congregations, Kaneohe, Hawaii, 1992 (1992)

This survey of Hope Chapel Kaneohe participants was part of a large research grant from the Lilly Endowment to study rapidly growing non-mainline churches. Hope Chapel Kaneohe (Kaneohe, HI) was one of four non-mainline churches surveyed.

New Evangelical Movement Congregations, Hermosa Beach, California, 1992 (1992)

This survey of Hope Chapel Hermosa Beach participants was part of a large research grant from the Lilly Endowment to study rapidly growing non-mainline churches. Hope Chapel Hermosa Beach (Hermosa Beach, CA) was one of four non-mainline churches surveyed.

Effective Christian Education: A National Study of Protestant Congregations, 1991 - Adult Component (1991)

Conducted by the Search Institute, this national study was unprecedented in size and scope, involving within each denomination nationally representative samples of congregations and their adult members (excluding pastors, coordinators of Christian education, or Christian education teachers). Individuals in 561 randomly chosen congregations provided in-depth, survey-based data on faith, loyalty, religious biography, congregational life, and the dynamics of Christian education programming. The original project components included Adults, Youth, Coordinators of Christian Education, Pastors and Teachers. Two subsequent components, Core and Leadership have been added. This file contains the Adult component.

The study focuses primarily on formal Christian education, defined as the programs and events a congregation intentionally offers to teach the faith to children, teen-agers, and adults. Christian education includes Sunday school, church school, Bible studies, confirmation, camping, retreats, workshops, youth ministry and youth groups, children and adult choirs, auxiliaries for men and women, prayer groups, religious plays and dramas, Vacation Bible School, new member classes, and intergenerational or family events and programs. Attention is also given to the role of other congregational factors, including what many might call "informal education," or the values, symbols, culture and patterns of interactions that help describe congregational life.

Effective Christian Education: A National Study of Protestant Congregations, 1991 - Adolescent Component (1991)

Conducted by the Search Institute, this national study was unprecedented in size and scope, involving within each denomination nationally representative samples of congregations and their adolescents. Individuals from 561 randomly chosen congregations provided in-depth, survey-based data on faith, loyalty, religious biography, congregational life, and the dynamics of Christian education programming. The original project components included Adults, Youth, Coordinators of Christian Education, Pastors and Teachers. Two subsequent components, Core and Leadership have been added. This file contains the Youth component.

The study focuses primarily on formal Christian education, defined as the programs and events a congregation intentionally offers to teach the faith to children, teen-agers, and adults. Christian education includes Sunday school, church school, Bible studies, confirmation, camping, retreats, workshops, youth ministry and youth groups, children and adult choirs, auxiliaries for men and women, prayer groups, religious plays and dramas, Vacation Bible School, new member classes, and intergenerational or family events and programs. Attention is also given to the role of other congregational factors, including what many might call "informal education," or the values, symbols, culture, and patterns of interactions that help describe congregational life.

Effective Christian Education: A National Study of Protestant Congregations, 1991 - Core Component (1991)

Conducted by the Search Institute, this national study was unprecedented in size and scope, involving within each denomination nationally representative samples of congregations and their adolescents, pastors, teachers, coordinators of Christian education and other adults. More than 11,000 individuals in 561 randomly chosen congregations provided in-depth, survey-based data on faith, loyalty, religious biography, congregational life, and the dynamics of Christian education programming. The study focuses primarily on formal Christian education, defined as the programs and events a congregation intentionally offers to teach the faith to children, teen-agers, and adults. Christian education includes Sunday school, church school, Bible studies, confirmation, camping, retreats, workshops, youth ministry and youth groups, children and adult choirs, auxiliaries for men and women, prayer groups, religious plays and dramas, Vacation Bible School, new member classes, and intergenerational or family events and programs. Attention is also given to the role of other congregational factors, including what many might call "informal education," or the values, symbols, culture, and patterns of interactions that help describe congregational life. The original project components included Adults, Youth, Coordinators of Christian Education, Pastors and Teachers. Two subsequent components, Core and Leadership have been added. This file contains the Core component. This component was taken from all five of the original files, where 255 questions were asked of all respondents.

Effective Christian Education: A National Study of Protestant Congregations, 1991 - Teachers Component (1991)

Conducted by the Search Institute, this national study was unprecedented in size and scope, involving within each denomination nationally representative samples of congregations and their Christian education teachers. Individuals from randomly chosen congregations provided in-depth, survey-based data on faith, loyalty, religious biography, congregational life, and the dynamics of Christian education programming. The original project components included Adults, Youth, Coordinators of Christian Education, Pastors and Teachers. Two subsequent components, Core and Leadership have been added. This file contains the Teachers component.

The study focuses primarily on formal Christian education, defined as the programs and events a congregation intentionally offers to teach the faith to children, teen-agers, and adults. Christian education includes Sunday school, church school, Bible studies, confirmation, camping, retreats, workshops, youth ministry and youth groups, children and adult choirs, auxiliaries for men and women, prayer groups, religious plays and dramas, Vacation Bible School, new member classes, and intergenerational or family events and programs. Attention is also given to the role of other congregational factors, including what many might call "informal education," or the values, symbols, culture, and patterns of interactions that help describe congregational life.

Effective Christian Education: A National Study of Protestant Congregations, 1991 - Pastors Component (1991)

Conducted by the Search Institute, this national study was unprecedented in size and scope, involving within each denomination nationally representative samples of congregations and their pastors. Pastors from randomly chosen congregations provided in-depth, survey-based data on faith, loyalty, religious biography, congregational life, and the dynamics of Christian education programming. The original project components included Adults, Youth, Coordinators of Christian Education, Pastors and Teachers. Two subsequent components, Core and Leadership have been added.

The study focuses primarily on formal Christian education, defined as the programs and events a congregation intentionally offers to teach the faith to children, teen-agers, and adults. Christian education includes Sunday school, church school, Bible studies, confirmation, camping, retreats, workshops, youth ministry and youth groups, children and adult choirs, auxiliaries for men and women, prayer groups, religious plays and dramas, Vacation Bible School, new member classes, and intergenerational or family events and programs. Attention is also given to the role of other congregational factors, including what many might call "informal education," or the values, symbols, culture, and patterns of interactions that help describe congregational life.

Effective Christian Education: A National Study of Protestant Congregations, 1991 - Coordinators Component (1991)

Conducted by the Search Institute, this national study was unprecedented in size and scope, involving within each denomination nationally representative samples of congregations and their coordinators of Christian education. Individuals in 561 randomly chosen congregations provided in-depth, survey-based data on faith, loyalty, religious biography, congregational life, and the dynamics of Christian education programming. The original project components included Adults, Youth, Coordinators of Christian Education, Pastors and Teachers. Two subsequent components, Core and Leadership have been added. This file contains the Coordinators component.

The study focuses primarily on formal Christian education, defined as the programs and events a congregation intentionally offers to teach the faith to children, teen-agers, and adults. Christian education includes Sunday school, church school, Bible studies, confirmation, camping, retreats, workshops, youth ministry and youth groups, children and adult choirs, auxiliaries for men and women, prayer groups, religious plays and dramas, Vacation Bible School, new member classes, and intergenerational or family events and programs. Attention is also given to the role of other congregational factors, including what many might call "informal education," or the values, symbols, culture, and patterns of interactions that help describe congregational life.

Effective Christian Education: A National Study of Protestant Congregations, 1991 - Leadership (1991)

Conducted by the Search Institute, this national study was unprecedented in size and scope, involving within each denomination nationally representative samples of congregations and their pastors, teachers, and coordinators of Christian education. Individuals in 561 randomly chosen congregations provided in-depth, survey-based data on faith, loyalty, religious biography, congregational life, and the dynamics of Christian education programming. The study focuses primarily on formal Christian education, defined as the programs and events a congregation intentionally offers to teach the faith to children, teen-agers, and adults. Christian education includes Sunday school, church school, Bible studies, confirmation, camping, retreats, workshops, youth ministry and youth groups, children and adult choirs, auxiliaries for men and women, prayer groups, religious plays and dramas, Vacation Bible School, new member classes, and intergenerational or family events and programs. Attention is also given to the role of other congregational factors, including what many might call "informal education," or the values, symbols, culture, and patterns of interactions that help describe congregational life. The original project components included Adults, Youth, Coordinators of Christian Education, Pastors and Teachers. Two subsequent components, Core and Leadership have been added. This file contains the Leadership component. This component was taken from the Coordinators, Pastors and Teachers data files. Each of these components asked 289 specific questions related to leadership in the church.

Rural Ministry Project, Clergy, 1990 (1990)

The purpose of this project was to develop a profile of churches in Minnesota by focusing on rural congregations in 10 different denominations. These denominations included: Assemblies of God; Baptist General Conference; Christian and Missionary Alliance; Episcopal Church; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Evangelical Free Church of America; Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.); Roman Catholic Church; United Church of Christ; and United Methodist Church. The questionnaire was designed to secure information about the types of congregations in Minnesota, the patterns of membership and finance, the range of activities in the life of the typical church, the ways pastors and lay persons see people being attracted to and encouraged to remain in rural ministry, and other relevant information about the present status of congregations in the state. In consultations with denominational leaders, research results were used to assist theological schools in better serving their congregations and denominations. The Pastor's Survey was completed by pastors from the randomly selected churches.

Rural Ministry Project, Lay Leaders, 1990 (1990)

The purpose of this project was to develop a profile of churches in Minnesota by focusing on rural congregations in 10 different denominations. These denominations included: Assemblies of God; Baptist General Conference; Christian and Missionary Alliance; Episcopal Church; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Evangelical Free Church of America; Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.); Roman Catholic Church; United Church of Christ; and United Methodist Church. The questionnaire was designed to secure information about the types of congregations in Minnesota, the patterns of membership and finance, the range of activities in the life of the typical church, the ways pastors and lay persons see people being attracted to and encouraged to remain in rural ministry, and other relevant information about the present status of congregations in the state. In consultations with denominational leaders, research results were used to assist theological schools in better serving their congregations and denominations. The Lay Leader's Survey was completed by lay leaders identified by their church's pastor.

UFO Abductees in the United States, 1990 (1990)

Survey data on new religious movements (NRM) in the United States are difficult to find, particularly when the movements in question are reticent to talk with outsiders. UFO abductees are individuals who believe they have been kidnapped by extra-terrestrials. Many abductees believe that extraterrestrials have the ability to erase memories of the abduction. In the 1980s a number of support groups for abductees appeared in the United States with the expressed purpose of helping abductees to recover their memories of alien abductions. The principal investigator was able to survey the membership of one such group, the UFO Contact Center International (now defunct) in 1990.

The survey contained a series of demographic questions, including gender, age, marital status and history, and occupation. At the group’s request, the survey also included several items regarding the abduction experience itself, such as the number of reported abductions, the abductees’ feelings about the experience, dates of abductions, and methods used to recover memories. These data provide a snapshot of the UFO abduction movement as it appeared in 1990.

Mennonite Church Member Profile, 1989 (1989)

"The objectives of the survey were to obtain a profile of the religious beliefs, attitudes, and practices of members of the participating [Mennonite] denominations...to identify trends in these areas that would provide clues regarding the impact of modernization on Mennonite life and thought....There was also interest in determining whether modernization involved increases in secularism, individualism, and materialism." (Kauffman and Driedger, 1991).

Profiles of Ministry I, 1989 (1989)

This study was conducted to gather information on and assess the readiness of divinity students to be good parish ministers. Profiles of the Ministry I includes general biographical information on seminarians from 115 seminaries in a variety of degree programs.

Vineyard Christian Fellowship Study, 1988 (1988)

Recently North America has witnessed the rapid growth of a new set of thriving sects, independent churches, and new evangelical churches. This study focuses on the members of one of these movements, the Vineyard Christian Fellowship. Although in relative terms the Vineyard remains somewhat small, it has had a significant impact on the religious landscape. The movement, which originated in Southern California, has spread throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and Australia. Currently there are over 300 Vineyards within the United States alone. The success of the Vineyard raises several important questions. This study attempts to address some of these questions by focusing on the religious background of Vineyard switchers and converts, the reasons for their coming to Vineyard, and the ways in which they express their religiosity. In all, a total of 1,009 surveys were collected from 14 Vineyard congregations in California and Washington.

Church and Community Project, 1987 (1987)

The purpose of this study is to learn about members' beliefs and attitudes about basic aspects of church life. Results are intended to help churches plan and develop programs for the future. Participating churches were primarily from cities and towns in Illinois and Indiana and include Protestant and Catholic congregations ranging from 47 to more than 2,000 members.

Women of the Cloth, 1983 (1983)

More than 1,300 female and male clergy, seminary faculty, church executives and lay people of nine major Protestant denominations were interviewed regarding their views on church ministry and involvement in the community. These data also provide information regarding men and women's attitudes towards female leadership in the church, as well as information regarding clergy members' seminary and ministry experiences.