International Data: National Surveys

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Brazil Religion Survey, 2007

This survey examines religious affiliation, belief, and practice, demographic factors, and views on social issues (divorce, euthanasia, abortion, homosexuality, etc.) in Brazil.

Caucasus Barometer 2012, Armenia

The Caucasus Research Resource Centers (CRRC) conducts this annual survey in the South Caucasus (e.g., Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia) in order to gauge the social, political and economic issues in the former Soviet Union region. In addition to the questions asked in previous rounds, CRRC has included new questions assessing social capital and religious views – the latter were asked in collaboration with ARDA. The same survey and methodological approach is applied to all three countries. However, Armenian respondents were asked additional questions pertaining to the Armenian Genocide and Georgian respondents were asked additional questions about opinions toward Joseph Stalin as part of a project with Carnegie Endowment for International Peace entitled, “The Stalin Puzzle: Deciphering Post-Soviet Public Opinion.” This is the only survey in the region providing reliable comparative data about the opinions, household composition, and economic behavior of the population of the three countries over the last nine years.

Caucasus Barometer 2012, Azerbaijan

The Caucasus Research Resource Centers (CRRC) conducts this annual survey in the South Caucasus (e.g., Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia) in order to gauge the social, political and economic issues in the former Soviet Union region. In addition to the questions asked in previous rounds, CRRC has included new questions assessing social capital and religious views – the latter were asked in collaboration with ARDA. The same survey and methodological approach is applied to all three countries. However, Armenian respondents were asked additional questions pertaining to the Armenian Genocide and Georgian respondents were asked additional questions about opinions toward Joseph Stalin as part of a project with Carnegie Endowment for International Peace entitled, “The Stalin Puzzle: Deciphering Post-Soviet Public Opinion.” This is the only survey in the region providing reliable comparative data about the opinions, household composition, and economic behavior of the population of the three countries over the last nine years.

Caucasus Barometer 2012, Georgia

The Caucasus Research Resource Centers (CRRC) conducts this annual survey in the South Caucasus (e.g., Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia) in order to gauge the social, political and economic issues in the former Soviet Union region. In addition to the questions asked in previous rounds, CRRC has included new questions assessing social capital and religious views – the latter were asked in collaboration with ARDA. The same survey and methodological approach is applied to all three countries. However, Armenian respondents were asked additional questions pertaining to the Armenian Genocide and Georgian respondents were asked additional questions about opinions toward Joseph Stalin as part of a project with Carnegie Endowment for International Peace entitled, “The Stalin Puzzle: Deciphering Post-Soviet Public Opinion.” This is the only survey in the region providing reliable comparative data about the opinions, household composition, and economic behavior of the population of the three countries over the last nine years.

Complementary and Alternative Medical (CAM) and Spirituality, Religiosity Survey

This survey contains measures for examining the effect of spirituality on health. Topics for spirituality and religiosity measures include: spiritual and meditative practice, spiritual experiences, values, forgiveness, private religious practice, religious and spiritual coping, religious support, religious and spiritual history, organized religious practice and preference, meaning. Topics for health measures include: frequency and positivity of exceptional experiences, mindfulness, and current problems. Other data include basic demographic characteristics.

English Church Census, 1989

The English Church Census, 1989 was carried out on October 15th, 1989 by MARC Europe (this research body ceased to exist and Christian Research was formed out of it). The main aim of the survey was to get details of church attendance in England by denomination, churchmanship, county and environment. Comparable studies have been conducted in 1979, 1998, and 2005.

English Church Census, 2005

The fourth English Church Census was carried out on 8 May 2005. Comparable studies had been conducted in 1979, 1989 and 1998. All were organised and led by Dr Peter Brierley, executive director of the organisation Christian Research prior to his retirement in 2007. The goal of the study was to enumerate a complete census of Trinitarian Christian churches in England and their attendance, along with gathering data on a number of questions relating to age and racial makeup, evangelistic ministries, and mission-related activities. A similar attendance survey in Scotland was conducted in 2002.

Exceptional Experience Questionnaire

This survey contains measures for exceptional, or paranormal, experiences. Topics include positive spiritual experiences (i.e., being illumined by divine light and strength), negative spiritual experiences (i.e., worldview falling apart), psychopathological experiences (i.e., hearing voices), and visionary dream experiences (i.e., dreaming so vividly that dreams reverberate when awake). Other data include basic demographic characteristics.

National Congregations Study Switzerland, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006, and 2008)

This dataset is the first representative survey of religious congregations in Switzerland. A representative sample of approximately 1,000 Swiss congregations was developed and a leader of each congregation was interviewed, using a standardized questionnaire. The central questions of this survey deal with congregational vitality and what congregations in Switzerland offer concerning worship, social, political and cultural activities.

National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Elderly Population

The Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL) and the National Council to Prevent Discrimination developed the National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico to assess the amount of discrimination in the everyday lives of Mexican citizens. Specifically, SEDESOL wanted to analyze the problem from the perspectives of the general population and from specific vulnerable populations. For this reason, the survey developed seven different questionnaires: a general questionnaire for the general population and six separate questionnaires for targeted vulnerable populations. These targeted vulnerable populations included: a) population of elderly people, b) indigenous population, c) population with non-Catholic religious beliefs, d) female population, e) people with disabilities, and (f) individuals with non-heterosexual preferences, which became a case study due to the difficulty covering that specific targeted population.

This dataset examines the responses of 761 individuals among the elderly population in Mexico. These individuals were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; how they feel society generally treats them; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their age; what action should be taken to prevent elderly discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination towards the elderly population; the life opportunities of the elderly; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination towards the elderly has changed over the years. The methodology, questionnaire, and responses in the dataset were translated from Spanish into English.

National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Religious Minorities

The Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL) and the National Council to Prevent Discrimination developed the National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico to assess the amount of discrimination in the everyday lives of Mexican citizens. Specifically, SEDESOL wanted to analyze the problem from the perspectives of the general population and from specific vulnerable populations. For this reason, the survey developed seven different questionnaires: a general questionnaire for the general population and six separate questionnaires for targeted vulnerable populations. These targeted vulnerable populations included: a) population of elderly people, b) indigenous population, c) population with non-Catholic religious beliefs, d) female population, e) people with disabilities, and (f) individuals with non-heterosexual preferences, which became a case study due to the difficulty covering that specific targeted population.

This dataset examines the responses of 789 individuals with non-Catholic religious beliefs in Mexico. These religious minorities were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their religious beliefs; whether or not Catholics have more privileges in society; what action should be taken to prevent religious discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination toward religious minorities; the life opportunities of religious minorities; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination toward religious minorities has changed over the years. The methodology, questionnaire, and responses in the dataset were translated from Spanish into English.

Noordin Top Terrorist Network Data

The Noordin Top Terrorist Network Data were drawn primarily from "Terrorism in Indonesia: Noordin's Networks," a publication of the International Crisis Group, and include relational data on 79 individuals discussed in that publication. The dataset includes information on these individuals' affiliations with terrorist/insurgent organizations, educational institutions, businesses, and religious institutions. It also outlines which individuals are classmates, kin, friends, and co-religionists, and it details which individuals provided logistical support or participated in training events, terrorist operations, and meetings.

Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey, 1998 - Religious Observance Module

The Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey was launched in the autumn of 1998. Its mission has been to monitor the attitudes and behaviour of people in Northern Ireland during the late 1990s and into the present century, in order to provide a time-series and a public record of how our attitudes and behaviour develop on a wide range of social policy issues. The survey is run on a modular format. Two modules are repeated every year (Political Attitudes and Community Relations), and the rest of the survey varies annually with all the modules designed to be repeated in years to come.

Each year, more than 30 countries participate in the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) in which the same module of questions is asked cross-nationally. Northern Ireland has taken part in this exercise (via NISA) since 1989. The 1998 module covered religion. Full ISSP datasets can be obtained from the Zentralarchiv in Koln, Germany, where the datasets from the member countries are assembled.

Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey, 2004

The Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey was launched in the autumn of 1998. Its mission has been to monitor the attitudes and behaviour of people in Northern Ireland during the late 1990s and into the present century, in order to provide a time-series and a public record of how our attitudes and behaviour develop on a wide range of social policy issues. The survey is run on a modular format. Two modules are repeated every year (Political Attitudes and Community Relations), and the rest of the survey varies annually with all the modules designed to be repeated in years to come. The specialty modules for 2004 are Men's Life and Times, Countryside and Farming, Religious Observance, and Grandparenting and Family Life.

Each year, more than 30 countries participate in the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP), in which the same module of questions is asked cross-nationally. Northern Ireland has taken part in this exercise (via NISA) since 1989. The 1998 module covered religion. Full ISSP datasets can be obtained from the Zentralarchiv in Koln, Germany, where the datasets from the member countries are assembled.

Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey, 2008

The Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey was launched in the autumn of 1998. Its mission has been to monitor the attitudes and behaviour of people in Northern Ireland during the late 1990s and into the present century, in order to provide a time-series and a public record of how our attitudes and behaviour develop on a wide range of social policy issues. The survey is run on a modular format. Two modules are repeated every year (Political Attitudes and Community Relations), and the rest of the survey varies annually with all the modules designed to be repeated in years to come. The specialty modules for 2008 are Attitudes to Older People, Religious Observance, and Minority Ethnic People.

Each year, more than 30 countries participate in the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP), in which the same module of questions is asked cross-nationally. Northern Ireland has taken part in this exercise (via NISA) since 1989. The 1998 module covered religion. Full ISSP datasets can be obtained from the Zentralarchiv in Koln, Germany, where the datasets from the member countries are assembled.

Party Variation in Religiosity and Womens Leadership: Lebanon Dataset

These data were collected for a study of how the characteristics of political parties influence women's chances in assuming leadership positions within the parties' inner structures. Data were compiled by Fatima Sbaity Kassem for a case-study of Lebanon and by national and local researchers for 25 other countries in Asia, Africa and Europe. Researchers gathered information about parties' year of origin, number of seats in parliament, political platform, and all sex-disaggregated party data (in percentages) on overall party membership, shares in executive and decision-making bodies, and nominations on electoral lists. A key variable measures party religiosity, which refers to the religious components on their political platforms or the extent to which religion penetrates their political agendas.

Only parties that have at least one seat in the any of the last three parliaments were included. These are referred to as ‘relevant’ parties. The four data sets combined cover 330 political parties in Lebanon plus 12 other Arab countries (Algeria, Bahrain, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Mauritania, Morocco, Palestine, Tunisia, Yemen), seven non-Arab Muslim-majority countries (Albania, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Indonesia, Senegal, Turkey), five European countries with dominant Christian democratic parties (Austria, Belgium, Italy, Germany, the Netherlands), and Israel.

Project Canada 1975

Begun in 1975, Project Canada has generated extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion. The project has taken representative samples of Canadians every five years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

Project Canada 1975-80 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1975-85 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1975-90 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1975-95 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1980

Begun in 1975, Project Canada has generated extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion. The project has taken representative samples of Canadians every five years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored. This is the second of these studies.

Project Canada 1980-85 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1980-90 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1980-95 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1985

This survey was the third in the Project Canada adult surveys. Begun in 1975, Project Canada has generated extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion. The project has taken representative samples of Canadians every five years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

Project Canada 1985-90 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1985-95 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1990

This survey was the fourth in the Project Canada adult surveys. Begun in 1975, Project Canada has generated extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion. The project has taken representative samples of Canadians every five years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

Project Canada 1990-95 Panel Study

The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge. National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.

Project Canada 1995

This survey was the fifth in the Project Canada adult surveys. Begun in 1975, Project Canada has generated extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion. The project has taken representative samples of Canadians every five years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.

Religion in Italy

This survey examines a variety of religious and non-religious topics in Italy. Religious topics include: morality of behaviors (abortion, theft, divorce, homosexuality, etc.), religious beliefs, the meaning of life, religious experiences, participation in religious rituals, views concerning and participation in sacraments, moral issues surrounding pregnancy, the role of the Catholic Church in society, obstacles to becoming clergy or a monastic, and belief in paranormal phenomena. Other topics include views on Italy's politics and economy, political party, life satisfaction, use of leisure time, geographic region, and demographic characteristics.

Religious Coping in Iran

The aim of this study was to develop and validate an initial religious coping scale for Iranians based on Kenneth Pargament's religious coping scale (RCOPE). The questionnaire was created using items from the original RCOPE scale and items created by the primary investigator based on Islamic teachings.

Scottish Church Census, 2002

The second Scottish Church Census was carried out on May 11-12, 2002. Comparable studies have been conducted in Scotland in 1984 and 1994 and in England in 1979, 1989, 1998 and 2005. All were organized and led by Dr Peter Brierley, executive director of the organization Christian Research prior to his retirement in 2007.

The aim of the study was to ascertain the number and frequency of people attending church of all denominations in Scotland in 2002. Several denominational changes had taken place in Scotland since the last census in 1994 (SN 4395) and 1984 (SN 2554). Political changes, with the formation of the Scottish Parliament, had brought about boundary changes for many councils, by which church attendance was previously analyzed. A combination of denomination, political and population changes had necessitated a revision of church attendance. In particular the study was to evaluate if the age structure of churchgoers had altered over the past decade and to establish if the trend in decline in the number of young people attending Sunday worship in England was true of Scotland.

Spiritual Life Study of Chinese Residents

The lack of quality data has left academia with an unclear picture of what religious life is like in China. Much of what is known comes from government statistics, anecdotal reports from missionaries and religious organizations, or field research. The objective of this study was to design and collect a state of the art random sample of Chinese citizens and assess their religious and spiritual life. A high quality team of Chinese scholars was assembled for the project. The survey was designed in fall 2006. In the spring of 2007, Dr. Anna Sun led a research team to field test the survey in China. In May 2007 the data were collected. The survey was a face-to-face interview. Respondents were selected using a multi-stage method to select metropolitan cities, towns and administrative villages. The final survey was administered in 56 locales throughout China, including 3 municipal cities (Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing), 6 province capital cities (Guangzhou, Nanjing, Wuhan, Hefei, Xi’an and Chengdu). In addition, 11 regional level cities, 16 small towns, and 20 administrative villages were sampled. Within each locale, households were sampled within neighborhoods, and neighborhoods were sampled within administratively defined total neighborhood committees (government defined collections of neighborhoods). A KISH grid procedure was used to randomly select one respondent from each household for a face-to-face in-home interview.

Study of Mysticism in Chinese Buddhist Monks and Nuns

The social scientific study of mysticism has suggested a mystical experiential core that exists across traditions. Empirical studies have identified this “common core” in traditions such as Christian Protestants, Jews, Hindus, and Persian Muslims. There has been a lack of understanding in the mystical experience among Oriental Buddhism both in its content and in its structure.

The current study explores the phenomenological structure of mystical experience among 139 Chinese Pure Land (i.e., Jingtu) and Chan Buddhist monks and nuns. Semi-structured interviews, thematic coding, and statistical analyses demonstrated that Stace’s common facets (i.e., Ego Loss, Timelessness/Spacelessness, Unity, Inner Subjectivity, Positive Affect, Sacredness, Noetic Quality, Ineffability) of mysticism as measured by Hood’s Mysticism Scale successfully described Buddhist experience as modified by Buddhist doctrines. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that these facets could be formed into Stace’s three-factor structure (i.e., Introvertive Mysticism, Extrovertive Mysticism, Interpretation).

These data contribute to the understanding of religious experience shared by practicing Buddhists, and lend strong support to the thesis that the phenomenology of mystical experience reveals a common experiential core that can be discerned across religious and spiritual traditions. The posted data are quantitative codes of interviews which reflect whether a participant has or has not had a certain mystical experience. Qualitative analyses of specific contents of mystical experiences are available in the published paper.

Taiwan Social Change Survey, 1985

“The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world….

“The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS). In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community.” (Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica.) The 1985 Taiwan Social Change Survey is the first phase and first wave of Questionnaire 2.

Taiwan Social Change Survey, 1994

“The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world….

“The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS). In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community.” (Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica.) This survey is the second phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire 2.

Taiwan Social Change Survey, 1999

Of the Taiwan Social Change Surveys, this particular survey file is the third phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire 2. “The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world….

“The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS). In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community.”
(Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica.)

Taiwan Social Change Survey, 2004

“The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world….

“The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS). In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community.” (Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica.) This survey is the fourth phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire 2.

Taiwan Social Change Survey, 2009

The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed five-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world.

The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS). In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community. This survey is the fifth phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire II: Religion.

Typology of Dutch Catholic Parishes, 2003

This dataset examines characteristics of Dutch Catholic Parishes, including their purpose, activities, participants, target group, visitors, and slogan or motto.