Data Archive

Data Archive > Most Recent Additions

Search Data Archive:
 

Recent Additions

Measuring Morality Study, 2012 (Uploaded: 3/31/2014)

The first phase of the Measuring Morality project involves fielding a nationally-representative survey of adults in the United States aimed at understanding the interrelations among moral constructs, and at exploring moral differences in the U.S. population. Survey items were chosen in consultation with an international group of scholars from sociology, psychology, and linguistics, and represent a wide range of theoretical traditions. The survey includes both morality scales (typically shortened for inclusion on the survey, and including several recently developed scales), and measures of constructs theoretically associated with morality.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Church of the Nazarene Attender Survey (Uploaded: 3/28/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology: A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for an oversample of Church of the Nazarene worship attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (Wave 2 Church of the Nazarene Congregational Profile data, and Church of the Nazarene Leader data will be provided in separate data files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Church of the Nazarene Leader Survey (Uploaded: 3/28/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and © a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi or other principal leader. Together, the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology: A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for the Church of the Nazarene Leader Survey for congregations participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 Nazarene Attender data and Nazarene Congregational Profile data will be provided in separate data files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Church of the Nazarene Congregational Profile Survey (Uploaded: 3/28/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi or other principal leader. Together, the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology: A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for the sample of the Church of the Nazarene congregations that completed the Congregational Profile Survey form. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 Nazarene Attender data and Nazarene Leader data will be provided in separate data files.)

Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2009 - Education and Other Topics, Members and Elders (Uploaded: 3/28/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2009 survey focuses on the public education system. This dataset contains data from members and elders in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2009 - Education and Other Topics, Clergy (Uploaded: 3/28/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2009 survey focuses on the public education system. This dataset contains data from clergy in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Pastors and specialized clergy constitute this sample.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2009 - Education and Other Topics, All (Uploaded: 3/28/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2009 survey focuses on the public education system. This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.

General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing) (Uploaded: 3/17/2014)

This file differs from the General Social Survey 2010 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing) (Uploaded: 3/17/2014)

This file differs from the General Social Survey 2010 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2010 GSS. There are a total of 4,901 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

The 2010 GSS featured special modules on aging, the Internet, shared capitalism, gender roles, intergroup relations, immigration, meeting spouse, knowledge about and attitudes toward science, religious identity, religious trends, genetics, veterans, crime and victimization, social networks and group membership, and sexual behavior (continuing the series started in 1988).

The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. The 2006 GSS was the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2006 was selected for reinterview in 2008 and again in 2010 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2008 GSS consists of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2006. The 2010 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 2,044, the first reinterview wave of the 2,023 2008 panel cases with 1,581 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2006 panel with 1,276 completed cases. Altogether, the 2010 GSS had 4,901 cases (2,044 in the new 2010 panel, 1,581 in the 2008 panel, and 1,276 in the 2006 panel). The 2010 GSS is the first round to fully implement the new, rolling panel design. In 2012 and later GSSs, there will likewise be a fresh cross-section (wave one of a new panel), wave two panel cases from the immediately preceding GSS, and wave three panel cases from the next earlier GSS.

American Time Use Survey, 2010 (Uploaded: 1/10/2014)

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2010 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Well-Being Module. Variables from the 2010 Well-Being Module have names that begin with the letter 'W.'

Note: The Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that there was an error in the activity selection process for the 2010 Well-Being Module. Due to a programming error in the data collection software, certain activities were less likely than others to be selected for follow-up questions in the WB Module. As of October 2013, the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau were exploring ways to mitigate the error; more information on this error could be found at the following link: http://www.bls.gov/tus/wbnotice.htm.