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Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2011 - Churchwide Special Offerings, All (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2011 survey focuses on special offerings. This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2011 - Churchwide Special Offerings, Clergy (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2011 survey focuses on churchwide special offerings. This dataset contains data from clergy members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Pastors and specialized clergy constitute this sample.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2095 Piazza, Terrorism Suspect Religious Identity and Support for Controversial Practices (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

The following study executes a survey experiment involving four treatment vignettes and one control vignette and 17 survey questions administered to 1,135 respondents. Respondents are randomly assigned to one of the five treatments which depict a short AP newswire blurb describing an arrest of two terrorist suspects in suburban Chicago. The treatments are identical to one another except they vary the names of the suspects (stereotypical Arabic/Muslim vs. Anglo-American) and the names of the terrorist movement the suspects are alleged to be members of (radical Islamists vs. right-wing American extremist). The control vignette omits any identification of the suspect names or groups. All respondents are then asked 13 questions rating their support for / approval of controversial interrogation and detention practices (10 interrogation practices, including the use of physical abuse of suspects, and three detention practices, including indefinite detention of suspects) that have been used by U.S. counterterrorism officials since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2047 Thornton, Understanding the Role of Religious Appeals in Political Communication (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

The following 2X2 experiment examines the concept of religious priming as well as the potential for political awareness to moderate discernible priming effects. The study follows a 2 (Religious Cues: Present, Absent) x 2 (Prior Information: Present, Absent) between subjects factorial design, with pretest and posttest questions. Religious cues are manipulated by providing respondents with a political advertisement including or excluding religious appeals. The second factor manipulates awareness, specifically how much information participants know about the political candidate’s policy preferences. As such, participants will be randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions (Information-Present, Cue-Present; Information-Present, Cue-Absent; Information-Absent, Cue-Present; Information-Absent, Cue-Absent). The information condition is simply whether one receives a one page pdf bio of the candidate; the religious cue condition is whether one receives a political ad with or without religious cues.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2104 Singer, The Effect of Question Wording on Preferences for Genetic Testing and Abortion (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

This question-wording experiment was designed to see whether using the term “fetus” rather than “baby” to ask questions would alter public preferences about prenatal testing for genetic defects and for abortion if a test revealed such defects. From 1990 through 2010, the GSS questions about prenatal testing and abortion were framed in terms of “baby” — for example: “Today, tests are being developed that make it possible to detect serious genetic defects before a baby is born." After the 2010 results were released, some researchers questioned whether the answers might have been different had the questions been framed in terms of “fetus” rather than “baby" because the word “fetus” may carry a more abstract, impersonal connotation than “baby” and might therefore lead to more frequent expressions of preferences for prenatal testing and abortion. To resolve this issue and provide guidance for future administrations of these questions in the GSS, the investigators designed a question-wording experiment fielded by TESS.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2011 - Churchwide Special Offerings, Members (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2011 survey focuses on churchwide special offerings. This dataset contains data from members and elders in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Philanthropy Panel Study, 2005 (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

The Philanthropy Panel Study is the Philanthropy Module of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The 2005 Panel contains data on the charitable giving, volunteering, and religious service attendance of more than 8,000 American families. The charitable giving data describe the giving done by the family unit as a whole. The volunteering and attendance data are separately available for both “Heads” and “Wives” (PSID terminology) in married couples and cohabiting families. The Panel also contains a question about who in married couples makes decisions about charitable giving.

The charitable giving data include religious giving and the volunteering data include religious volunteering. The religious giving and volunteering data—along with the religious attendance and religious affiliation data—make the Panel well-suited for the study of important religious behaviors within the PSID’s rich context of families’ economic, social, health, and demographic circumstances.

Orthodox Christian Fellowship in the United States: The Study of Orthodox Christian Clergy Serving as Chaplains in U.S. Colleges and Universities (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

This survey and study was designed in order to assess the present state of the Orthodox Christian Fellowship on the campuses of U.S. colleges and universities. Orthodox Christian Fellowship (OCF) is a U.S. national pan-Orthodox agency responsible for the Orthodox collegiate campus ministry. The study had three major goals:

The first goal was to conduct a comprehensive "inventory" of the local OCF chapters that are currently present on the campuses of American colleges and universities, to analyze their geography and membership, and to examine their programs and activities, their strengths and weaknesses.

The second goal was to investigate the question of what type of challenges local OCF chapters face and what their major needs are so that these challenges and needs could be properly addressed by the national Orthodox Church leadership and by the national OCF organization.

The third goal was to take a close look at the group of Orthodox clergy who serve as spiritual advisors (chaplains) for the local OCF chapters: to examine their "demography," professional training, forms and degree of involvement with various OCF activities and -- most importantly -- to better understand their major problems and concerns.

American Catholic Laity Poll, 2011 (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

The American Catholic Laity Poll contains many questions on pressing issues in the Catholic Church--views of the hierarchy, political positions of the church, women's roles in the church, what it takes to be a "good Catholic," how churches can respond to the current shortage of priests, and the effects of sex abuse in the church. Other questions also concern Mass attendance, prayer, Communion, and demographic characteristics. This poll contains respondents from many different generations of Catholics, and it also includes an oversample of Hispanic Catholics.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, United Methodist Church Congregational Profile Survey (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in 5,000-plus congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) — making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregation’s facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together, the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for a random sample of United Methodist Church (UMC) worship attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 UMC Congregational Profile data and UMC Leader data will be provided in separate files.)