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National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012) (Uploaded: 9/10/2014)

The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset "fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing, for the first time, data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations" (Chaves et al. 1999, p.460). Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the NCS data is the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. In 2006-07, a panel component was added to the NCS. In addition to the new cross-section of congregations generated in conjunction with the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS), a stratified random sample was drawn from congregations who participated in the 1998 NCS. The 2006-07 NCS sample, then, includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. The 2012 NCS includes an oversample of Hispanic congregations.

The NCS Panel Dataset is also available from the ARDA.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Attender Survey (Uploaded: 7/11/2014)

Over 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology: A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for a random sample of Evangelical Lutheran Church (ELCA) worship attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 ELCA Congregational Profile data and ELCA Leader data will be provided in separate files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Leader Survey (Uploaded: 7/11/2014)

Over 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology: A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition).

This data file contains data for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Leader Survey for congregations participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 ELCA Attender data and ELCA Congregational Profile data will be provided in separate data files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Congregational Profile Survey (Uploaded: 7/11/2014)

Over 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology: A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition).

This data file contains data for the sample of Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) congregations that completed the Congregational Profile Survey form. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 ELCA Attender data and ELCA Leader data will be provided in separate data files.)

Religion and State--Minorities (Uploaded: 7/11/2014)

This Religion and State-Minorities (RASM) dataset is supplemental to the Religion and State round 2 (RAS2) dataset. It codes the RAS religious discrimination variable using the minority as the unit of analysis (RAS2 uses a country as the unit of analysis and, is a general measure of all discrimination in the country). RASM codes religious discrimination by governments against all 566 minorities in 175 countries which make a minimum population cut off. Any religious minority which is at least 0.25 percent of the population or has a population of at least 500,000 (in countries with populations of 200 million or more) are included. The dataset also includes all Christian minorities in Muslim countries and all Muslim minorities in Christian countries for a total of 597 minorities. The data cover 1990 to 2008 with yearly codings.

These religious discrimination variables are designed to examine restrictions the government places on the practice of religion by minority religious groups. It is important to clarify two points. First, these variables focus on restrictions on minority religions. Restrictions that apply to all religions are not coded in this set of variables. This is because the act of restricting or regulating the religious practices of minorities is qualitatively different from restricting or regulating all religions. Second, this set of variables focuses only on restrictions of the practice of religion itself or on religious institutions and does not include other types of restrictions on religious minorities. The reasoning behind this is that there is much more likely to be a religious motivation for restrictions on the practice of religion than there is for political, economic, or cultural restrictions on a religious minority. These secular types of restrictions, while potentially motivated by religion, also can be due to other reasons. That political, economic, and cultural restrictions are often placed on ethnic minorities who share the same religion and the majority group in their state is proof of this.

This set of variables is essentially a list of specific types of religious restrictions which a government may place on some or all minority religions. These variables are identical to those included in the RAS2 dataset, save that one is not included because it focuses on foreign missionaries and this set of variables focuses on minorities living in the country. Each of the items in this category is coded on the following scale:

0. The activity is not restricted or the government does not engage in this practice.
1. The activity is restricted slightly or sporadically or the government engages in a mild form of this practice or a severe form sporadically.
2. The activity is significantly restricted or the government engages in this activity often and on a large scale.

A composite version combining the variables to create a measure of religious discrimination against minority religions which ranges from 0 to 48 also is included.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, 2012-2014 - Background Variables, Clergy (Uploaded: 7/11/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). Collected at the start of each new panel, the background variables provide information on the background, education, family, income and giving, and other information for participants in the 2012-2014 panel.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, 2012-2014 - Background Variables, Members and Elders (Uploaded: 7/11/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). Collected at the start of each new panel, the background variables provide information on the background, education, family, income and giving, and other information for participants in the 2012-2014 panel.

National Congregations Study Switzerland, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006, and 2008) (Uploaded: 6/16/2014)

This dataset is the first representative survey of religious congregations in Switzerland. A representative sample of approximately 1,000 Swiss congregations was developed and a leader of each congregation was interviewed, using a standardized questionnaire. The central questions of this survey deal with congregational vitality and what congregations in Switzerland offer concerning worship, social, political and cultural activities.

Noordin Top Terrorist Network Data (Uploaded: 6/16/2014)

The Noordin Top Terrorist Network Data were drawn primarily from "Terrorism in Indonesia: Noordin's Networks," a publication of the International Crisis Group, and include relational data on 79 individuals discussed in that publication. The dataset includes information on these individuals' affiliations with terrorist/insurgent organizations, educational institutions, businesses, and religious institutions. It also outlines which individuals are classmates, kin, friends, and co-religionists, and it details which individuals provided logistical support or participated in training events, terrorist operations, and meetings.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2010 - Congregational Leadership, Elders (Uploaded: 6/16/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2010 survey focuses on the pastoral leadership of Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This dataset contains data from elders of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) only.