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American Catholic Laity Poll, 2011 (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

The American Catholic Laity Poll contains many questions on pressing issues in the Catholic Church--views of the hierarchy, political positions of the church, women's roles in the church, what it takes to be a "good Catholic," how churches can respond to the current shortage of priests, and the effects of sex abuse in the church. Other questions also concern Mass attendance, prayer, Communion, and demographic characteristics. This poll contains respondents from many different generations of Catholics, and it also includes an oversample of Hispanic Catholics.

Orthodox Christian Fellowship in the United States: The Study of Orthodox Christian Clergy Serving as Chaplains in U.S. Colleges and Universities (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

This survey and study was designed in order to assess the present state of the Orthodox Christian Fellowship on the campuses of U.S. colleges and universities. Orthodox Christian Fellowship (OCF) is a U.S. national pan-Orthodox agency responsible for the Orthodox collegiate campus ministry. The study had three major goals:

The first goal was to conduct a comprehensive "inventory" of the local OCF chapters that are currently present on the campuses of American colleges and universities, to analyze their geography and membership, and to examine their programs and activities, their strengths and weaknesses.

The second goal was to investigate the question of what type of challenges local OCF chapters face and what their major needs are so that these challenges and needs could be properly addressed by the national Orthodox Church leadership and by the national OCF organization.

The third goal was to take a close look at the group of Orthodox clergy who serve as spiritual advisors (chaplains) for the local OCF chapters: to examine their "demography," professional training, forms and degree of involvement with various OCF activities and -- most importantly -- to better understand their major problems and concerns.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, United Methodist Church Congregational Profile Survey (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in 5,000-plus congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together, the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for a random sample of United Methodist Church (UMC) worship attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 UMC Congregational Profile data and UMC Leader data will be provided in separate files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, United Methodist Church Leader Survey (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in 5,000-plus congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together, the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for a random sample of United Methodist Church (UMC) worship attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 UMC Congregational Profile data and UMC Leader data will be provided in separate files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, United Methodist Church Attender Survey (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in 5,000-plus congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2) ó making it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together, the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for a random sample of United Methodist Church (UMC) worship attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 UMC Congregational Profile data and UMC Leader data will be provided in separate files.)

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2011 - Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA), Members (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 2011 survey focuses on the Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA) program. This dataset contains data from members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2011 - Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA), Clergy (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 2011 survey focuses on the Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA) program. This dataset contains data from clergy members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Pastors and specialized clergy constitute this sample.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2011 - Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA), All (Uploaded: 12/1/2014)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 2011 survey focuses on the Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA) program. This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.

National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012) - Instructional Dataset (Uploaded: 10/24/2014)

This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original National Congregations Study, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories and added as additional variables to the file.

The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset "fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing, for the first time, data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations" (Chaves et al. 1999, p.460). Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the NCS data is the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. In 2006-07, a panel component was added to the NCS. In addition to the new cross-section of congregations generated in conjunction with the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS), a stratified random sample was drawn from congregations who participated in the 1998 NCS. The 2006-07 NCS sample, then, includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. The 2012 NCS includes an oversample of Hispanic congregations.

The NCS Panel Dataset is also available from the ARDA.

Baylor Religion Survey, Wave II (2007) - Instructional Dataset (Uploaded: 10/9/2014)

This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2007 Baylor Religion Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.