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PRRI-RNS Religion News Survey, February 2013 (Uploaded: 6/20/2016)

The PRRI/ Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey investigated individuals' perceptions of and experiences in romantic relationships. Questions not only assessed views toward Valentine's Day, but also asked questions about their relationship status and perceptions of where problems emerge in marriages or romantic relationships.

PRRI-RNS Religion News Survey, April 2013 (Uploaded: 6/20/2016)

The PRRI/ Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey investigated public views of marijuana. Questions not only assessed basic familiarity, but also attitudes toward the legalization, use, as well as moral and religious perceptions of marijuana use.

PRRI-RNS Religion News Survey, June 2013 (Uploaded: 6/20/2016)

The PRRI/ Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey investigated individuals' perceptions of the United States of America. Questions not only assessed views toward America in the world, but also asked questions about American values, American identification, engagement in patriotic activities and American pride.

National Survey of Religious Identification, 1990 (Uploaded: 6/20/2016)

The National Survey of Religious Identification relates to a random digit-dialed telephone survey of 113,000 American households in the continental U.S. (48 states). The data was collected over a 13-month period by ICR Survey Research Group of Media, PA as part of their omnibus market research (EXCEL) survey. The prime question on the file is: What is your religion? If the initial answer was Protestant, there was a further question as to which denomination. The respondent is a randomly chosen (last birthday) adult over 18 years. Nineteen other socio-demographic questions are attached to this. The NSRI makes a significant contribution by presenting a large sample size reflecting the true richness of the country's religious tapestry and the national coverage necessary to provide high quality statistics on what is actually happening around us.

American Identification Survey, 2001 (Uploaded: 6/20/2016)

The American Identification Survey (ARIS) 2001 is a 10-year follow-up study of religious identification among American adults, undertaken for the first time in 1990. Carried out under the auspices of The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, the 1990 National Survey of Religious Identification (NSRI) was the most extensive survey of religious identification in the later half of 20th-century America. That study, like the current follow-up, was undertaken because the U.S. Census does not produce a religious profile of the American population. Yet, the religious categories into which a population sorts itself is surely no less important than some of the other social-demographic categories that are enumerated by the decennial census. This survey represents the first large-scale national survey of religious identification conducted among Americans in the 21st century. The primary question of the interview was: What is your religion, if any? The religion of the spouse/partner also was asked. If the initial answer was 'Protestant' or 'Christian,' further questions were asked to probe which particular denomination.

Religion and Politics Survey, September 2014 (Uploaded: 5/23/2016)

The September 2014 Religion Survey, sponsored by the Pew Research Center, obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,002 adults living in the United States. Interviews were conducted via landline (nLL=801) and cell phone (nC=1,201; including 682 without a landline phone). The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The interviews were administered in English and Spanish by Princeton Data Source from Sept. 2-9, 2014. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. The survey focused on Americans' views of Barack Obama, as well as how the Democratic and Republican parties have handled different issues. Measures included views on same-sex marriage, terrorism, abortion, healthcare and other policies, as well as several measures of respondents' religious and political preferences and behavior.

PRRI-RNS Religion News Survey, August 2012 (Uploaded: 5/23/2016)

The PRRI/ Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey investigated public views of the gun control laws. Questions not only assessed attitudes toward gun control but also the degree to which gun control was a reflection of a respondent's rights. Questions also included open-ended responses about what could be done to prevent mass shootings from occurring in the United States.

PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, June 2012 (Uploaded: 5/23/2016)

The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward topics discussed in the country today. Questions explored attitudes toward same-sex marriage, immigration policies, health care laws, and whether certain policies should be decided at the national or state level.

PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, July 2012 (Uploaded: 5/23/2016)

The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward technology. Questions explored the frequency of using social media for religious practice, use of technology during worship services, and a general connection between religion and technology.

PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, August 2013 (Uploaded: 5/23/2016)

The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward immigration. Questions explored Americans’ opinions regarding immigration reform policies and path to citizenship programs.


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