Congregational QuickStats > U.S. Congregations > Religious Identity

Theologically speaking, would your congregation be considered more on the conservative side, more on the liberal side, or right in the middle? (Recoded for use with online analysis) (National Congregations Study 2006-2007)

Each question was asked of a key informant from the congregation, such as a minister, priest, rabbi, or other staff person or leader.


Theology (National Congregations Study 2006-2007)

   

[Results weighted by W1]


Demographic Patterns


Theology (Demographic Patterns)


Theology by Year Founded


Before 19001900-19501951-19992000 or LaterMissingTOTAL
More on the conservative side59.4%
212
61.7%
235
65.6%
361
69.9%
65
4063.2%
873
Right in the middle31.9%
114
28.6%
109
26.7%
147
22.6%
21
3328.3%
391
More on the liberal side8.7%
31
9.7%
37
7.6%
42
7.5%
7
48.5%
117
MISSING18216036
TOTAL100.0%
357
100.0%
381
100.0%
550
100.0%
93
771381

[Back to Top]


Theology by Adult Members


25 or Less26-5051-100101-200More than 200MissingTOTAL
More on the conservative side52.3%
102
62.6%
226
70.2%
257
66.3%
187
55.7%
142
062.6%
914
Right in the middle40.5%
79
28.3%
102
23.8%
87
24.8%
70
33.7%
86
129.1%
424
More on the liberal side7.2%
14
9.1%
33
6.0%
22
8.9%
25
10.6%
27
08.3%
121
MISSING714885042
TOTAL100.0%
195
100.0%
361
100.0%
366
100.0%
282
100.0%
255
11459

[Back to Top]


Theology by Political Ideology


More on the conservative sideRight in the middleMore on the liberal sideMissingTOTAL
More on the conservative side85.9%
705
35.9%
175
7.4%
8
2662.7%
888
Right in the middle12.9%
106
58.2%
284
17.6%
19
1528.9%
409
More on the liberal side1.2%
10
5.9%
29
75.0%
81
08.5%
120
MISSING01304
TOTAL100.0%
821
100.0%
488
100.0%
108
411417

[Back to Top]


Theology by Region of the Country


New England or Mid-AtlanticEast North Central or West North CentralSouth Atlantic, East South Central, or West South CentralMountain or PacificTOTAL
More on the conservative side60.5%
118
63.2%
239
65.7%
450
52.7%
106
62.6%
913
Right in the middle28.7%
56
31.2%
118
27.9%
191
29.9%
60
29.1%
425
More on the liberal side10.8%
21
5.6%
21
6.4%
44
17.4%
35
8.3%
121
MISSING2931547
TOTAL100.0%
195
100.0%
378
100.0%
685
100.0%
201
1459

[Back to Top]


Theology by Religious Tradition


Roman CatholicWhite conservative, evangelical, or fundamentalistBlack ProtestantWhite liberal or moderateNon-ChristianTOTAL
More on the conservative side51.3%
39
80.9%
575
46.8%
160
44.3%
125
30.6%
15
62.6%
914
Right in the middle42.1%
32
15.5%
110
46.8%
160
36.9%
104
40.8%
20
29.2%
426
More on the liberal side6.6%
5
3.7%
26
6.4%
22
18.8%
53
28.6%
14
8.2%
120
MISSING326123246
TOTAL100.0%
76
100.0%
711
100.0%
342
100.0%
282
100.0%
49
1460

[Back to Top]


Theology by Year


19982006TOTAL
More on the conservative side59.4%
719
62.6%
914
61.2%
1633
Right in the middle29.3%
355
29.1%
425
29.2%
780
More on the liberal side11.2%
136
8.3%
121
9.6%
257
MISSING244771
TOTAL100.0%
1210
100.0%
1460
2670

[Back to Top]


Notes

The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset "fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing, for the first time, data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations" (Chaves et al. 1999, p.460). Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the NCS data is the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. In 2006-07, a panel component was added to the NCS. In addition to the new cross-section of congregations generated in conjunction with the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS), a stratified random sample was drawn from congregations who participated in the 1998 NCS. The 2006-07 NCS sample, then, includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. A full codebook, prepared by the primary investigator, is available for download here. The codebook contains the original questionnaire, as well as detailed information on survey methodology, weights, coding, and more.