QuickLists
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in QuickLists)
Timeline
  • Buddhist Churches of America: The Buddhist Churches of America, formed in 1944 and headquartered in San Francisco, represents mainstream Japanese American Buddhism.
  • Vietnamese Buddhists Come to United States : Vietnamese Buddhism spread across America as thousands of refugees arrived after the Vietnam War ended in 1975.
  • First Buddhist Temples Built: In the 1850s-1880s, Chinese and Japanese immigrants brought Buddhism to America as they searched for work in Hawaii's plantations and California's gold rush.
  • Fo Guang Shan Hsi Lai Buddhist Temple : Built in 1988, Hsi Lai Temple near Los Angeles is the largest Buddhist temple in the western hemisphere.
  • First Buddhists Elected to U.S. Congress : In November 2006, voters in Georgia and Hawaii elected the first two Buddhists --Democrats Hank Johnson and Mazie Hirono -- to the U.S. Congress.
  • First Daoist/Traditional Chinese Temples in the U.S. : Daoism (i.e., Taoism), one of China’s recognized religions, arrived in San Francisco in the 19th century as Chinese immigrants sought work in California’s gold rush.
  • Trungpa, Chogyam : Chogyam Trungpa (1939-87) is the founder of the largest Tibetan Buddhist group in America.
  • Suzuki, D.T. : Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1870-1966), a Zen Buddhist monk from Japan, helped to personify and explain Zen to a generation of Americans.
  • American Chapter of Soka Gakkai Formed : The Japanese-based Soka Gakkai Buddhist society commissioned its U.S. chapter in 1960. In 1991, the chapter reorganized as Soka Gakkai International-USA.
  • Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965: The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 (i.e., Hart-Celler Act) permitted more Muslim, Buddhist, and Hindu immigrants into the United States, changing the U.S. religious landscape.
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-15]  (of 15 total matches in Timelines)
Measurements
  • Buddhists, View of: Does the respondent have a warm\cold, positive\negative, favorable\unfavorable view of Buddhists or Buddhism?
  • Religious Tradition, Affiliation to: The general religious tradition with which a person identifies. Examples include Catholic, Protestant, Muslim, Buddhist, etc.
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Measurement Concepts)
ARDA Dictionary
  • Buddhist:An adherent of Buddhism.
  • Three Jewels:The three things that provide refuge for Buddhists: the Buddha, the Dharma (teaching), and the Sangha (Buddhist community) (Prothero 2008: 205).
  • Sangha:Monks and nuns who make up the Buddhist monastic community (Esposito et al. 2012b: G-14).
  • Three Marks of Existence:Described as impermanence, suffering, and no soul in the Buddhist conception of human reality (Esposito et al. 2012b: G-14).
  • Dharma:The proper course of conduct, norms and ultimate realities in the Buddhist religion. Dharma is central to Buddhist practice. The term also exists in Hinduism and Brahmanic thought as a set of ritual actions sanctioned by the priestly class (Smith and Green 1995: 315).
  • Enlightenment:The experience of knowing the cause of suffering in the Buddhist tradition. Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, is said to have experienced enlightenment under the Bodhi tree (ca 530 BCE) (Smith and Green 1995: 338).
  • Stupa:A Buddhist shrine, a raised mound surmounted by a ceremonial pole and umbrella. It usually contains relics of a Buddha or an enlightened saint (Esposito et al. 2012a: G-8).
  • Koan:A Buddhist riddle designed to foster spiritual growth, posed by a monastic leader to junior monks. An example includes: "What is the sound of one hand clapping?" (Esposito et al. 2012a: G-7).
  • Buddha:It literally means one who has "awakened," reaching enlightenment and escaping rebirth (see samsara). This also is the name given to Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of the Buddhist religion (Esposito et al. 2012a: G-6).
  • Anatman:A Buddhist doctrine denying the reality of a permanent, immortal soul as the spiritual center of a human. The term means "no self," and it is meant to teach that all things are connected and there is no separate existence (Esposito et al. 2012a: G-6).
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-20]  (of 20 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Religious Groups
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in Religious Groups)
Religious Family Trees
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Religion Family Trees)
Teaching Tools
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Teaching Tools)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Introducing the sort-of Buddhist: Or, "If there is no 'I' to have a religious identity, then how do I fill out this survey?"
    Spencer, Anne C., and Scott Draper (2018)
    Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion 14:3 (online)

    Reflection on respondents to a survey who identified themselves as "sort of" Buddhists.

    Associated Search Terms: Survey; Methods; Buddhist, U.S.A.; Identification
  • Paths to enlightement: Constructing Buddhist identities in mainland China and the United States.
    Di, Di (2018)
    Sociology of Religion 79:4: 449-471.

    Based on participant observation & interviews in a Mahayana Buddhist temple in China & one in the U.S. both national & temple contexts affected individual religious identity.

    Associated Search Terms: Identity; Participant observation; Freedom; Comparative; Chinese Americans; Buddhist, Theravada, U.S.A.; Buddhist, Theravada, China
  • (Re)producing Buddhist hegemony in Sri Lanka: Advancing th discursive formations of self-Orientalism, religious (im)mobility and "unethical" conversion.
    Woods, Orlando (2018)
    Religion 48:2: 215-235.

    Associated Search Terms: Hegemony; Sri Lanka; Buddhist, Sri Lanka; Conversion
  • Buddhism Co. Ltd? Epistemology of religiosity, and the re-invention of a Buddhist monastery in Hong Kong.
    Qian, Junxi, and Lily Kong (2018)
    Environment and Planning. D: Society and Space 36:1: 159-177.

    Share CAPTCHA Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code Request Permissions Related Articles [PDF]

    Associated Search Terms: China, Hong Kong; Monasticism; Sacred/profane; Buddhist, China
  • The Mindful Elite: Mobilizing from the Inside Out.
    Kucinskas, Jaime (2018)
    New York: Oxford University Press.

    Associated Search Terms: Meditation; Elite; Spirituality; Buddhist, U.S.A.
  • De l'émotion dans la conversion. Interactions émotionnelles et apprentissage au sein du bouddhisme dzogchen occidentalisé.
    Bianchi, Maria Alessandra (2018)
    Social Compass 65:3: 378-394.

    Based on participant observation in France & Italy, examines the emotion work of socializers (Dzogchen) in the formation of converts to Buddhism.

    Associated Search Terms: Buddhist, Italy; Convert; Emotion; Participant observation; Socialization; Symbolic interactionism; Buddhist, France
  • Progressive Activism among Buddhists, Hindus, and Muslims in the U.S.
    Yukich, Grace (2017)
    In Ruth Braunstein, Todd Nicholas Fuist, and Rhys H. Williams (eds.) Religion and Progressive Activism. New Stories about Faith and Politics. New York: New York University Press, pp. 225-245.

    Explores factors that inhibit sociologists from studying religious activism by Buddhists, Hindus, & Muslims in the U.S. Uses interviews with activists in the 3 traditions.

    Associated Search Terms: Hindu, U.S.A.; Buddhist, U.S.A.; Activism; Sociology of religion; Islam, U.S.A.
  • Understanding Young Buddhists. Living Out Ethical Journesys.
    Yip, Andrew K.T., and Sarah-Jane Page (2017)
    Leiden: Brill

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults; Buddhist, Great Britain; Great Britain
  • Religious intermarriage in Canada, 1981 to 2011.
    Lee, Sharon M., Feng Hou, Barry Edmonston, and Zheng Wu. (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:3: 667-677.

    1981-2011 Canadian census data show increasing intermarriage rates for Protestants, Catholics, Jews, & Buddhists, low & stable intermarriage rates for Hindus & Sikhs, & decreasing intermarriage rates for Muslims & the unaffiliated.

    Associated Search Terms: Canada; Marriage
  • Christian identification and self-reported depression: Evidence from China.
    Hu, Anning, Xiaozhao Yousef Yang, and Weixiang Luo (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:4: 765-780.

    Christians report more depression than others in China.

    Associated Search Terms: Buddhist, China; China; Christian, China; Depression; Atheist, China
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 350 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2010 (County File):
    This study, designed and carried out by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), compiled data on the number of congregations and adherents for 236 religious groups in each county of the United States. Participants included 217 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints, Messianic Jews, and Unitarian/Universalist groups); counts of Jain, Shinto, Sikh, Tao and National Spiritualist Association congregations, and counts of congregations and adherents from Bahá'ís, three Buddhist groupings, four Hindu groupings, four Jewish groupings, Muslims and Zoroastrians. The 236 groups reported a total of 344,894 congregations with 150,686,156 adherents, comprising 48.8 percent of the total U.S. population of 308,745,538 in 2010.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. ; The John Templeton Foundation ; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ; North American Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 8/6/2012
  • U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2010 (State File):
    This study, designed and carried out by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), compiled data on the number of congregations and adherents for 236 religious groups in each county of the United States. Participants included 217 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints, Messianic Jews, and Unitarian/Universalist groups); counts of Jain, Shinto, Sikh, Tao and National Spiritualist Association congregations, and counts of congregations and adherents from Bahá'ís, three Buddhist groupings, four Hindu groupings, four Jewish groupings, Muslims and Zoroastrians. The 236 groups reported a total of 344,894 congregations with 150,686,156 adherents, comprising 48.8 percent of the total U.S. population of 308,745,538 in 2010.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. ; The John Templeton Foundation ; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ; North American Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 8/6/2012
  • U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2010 (Metro Area File):
    This study, designed and carried out by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), compiled data on the number of congregations and adherents for 236 religious groups in each county of the United States. Participants included 217 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints, Messianic Jews, and Unitarian/Universalist groups); counts of Jain, Shinto, Sikh, Tao and National Spiritualist Association congregations, and counts of congregations and adherents from Bahá'ís, three Buddhist groupings, four Hindu groupings, four Jewish groupings, Muslims and Zoroastrians. The 236 groups reported a total of 344,894 congregations with 150,686,156 adherents, comprising 48.8 percent of the total U.S. population of 308,745,538 in 2010.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. ; The John Templeton Foundation ; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ; North American Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 8/6/2012
  • The Religion and State Project, Minorities Module, Round 3:
    The Religion and State (RAS) project is a university-based project located at Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. The general goal is to provide detailed codings on several aspects of separation of religion and state for 183 states on a yearly basis between 1990 and 2014. This constitutes all countries with populations of 250,000 or more, as well as a sampling of countries with lower populations.

    This module recodes the governmental and societal discrimination variables used in the Religion and State, Round 3 except that it uses a minority group within a state as the unit of analysis. For example, in the UK, Buddhists, Hindus, Jews, Muslims, Orthodox Christians, and Sikhs are all coded separately. The dataset includes all minorities which are at least 0.2% of the population as well as the following categories of minorities regardless of their population size: (1) Christians in Muslim countries, (2) Muslims in Christian countries, and (3) Jews in Christian-majority and Muslim-majority countries, where present.
    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation , Israel Science Foundation, The Sara and Simha Lainer Chair in Democracy and Civility, The Yehuda Avner Chair of Religion and Politics, and the German-Israel Foundation
    Collected: 2015, Uploaded 1/28/2019
  • Study of Mysticism in Chinese Buddhist Monks and Nuns:
    The social scientific study of mysticism has suggested a mystical experiential core that exists across traditions. Empirical studies have identified this "common core" in traditions such as Christian Protestants, Jews, Hindus, and Persian Muslims. There has been a lack of understanding in the mystical experience among Oriental Buddhism both in its content and in its structure.

    The current study explores the phenomenological structure of mystical experience among 139 Chinese Pure Land (i.e., Jingtu) and Chan Buddhist monks and nuns. Semi-structured interviews, thematic coding, and statistical analyses demonstrated that Stace's common facets (i.e., Ego Loss, Timelessness/Spacelessness, Unity, Inner Subjectivity, Positive Affect, Sacredness, Noetic Quality, Ineffability) of mysticism as measured by Hood's Mysticism Scale successfully described Buddhist experience as modified by Buddhist doctrines. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that these facets could be formed into Stace's three-factor structure (i.e., Introvertive Mysticism, Extrovertive Mysticism, Interpretation).

    These data contribute to the understanding of religious experience shared by practicing Buddhists, and lend strong support to the thesis that the phenomenology of mystical experience reveals a common experiential core that can be discerned across religious and spiritual traditions. The posted data are quantitative codes of interviews which reflect whether a participant has or has not had a certain mystical experience. Qualitative analyses of specific contents of mystical experiences are available in the published paper.
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 11/22/2013
  • Religion and Diversity Survey, 2002-2003:
    This survey includes questions about the public's views about religious diversity, such as attitudes toward and contact with Muslims, Hindus, and Buddhists. The survey was designed by Robert Wuthnow at Princeton University in conjunction with the Responding to Diversity Project sponsored by the Lilly Endowment. The survey also includes questions regarding religious beliefs and practices, and opinions concerning terrorism, interreligious understanding, and national identity. (Religion and Diversity Codebook, Princeton University, Department of Sociology, 2003).
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 10/16/2006
[Viewing Matches 1-6]  (of 6 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Investigators)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • RDSCMOST from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    In the past year, which scripture have you read most often, the Bible, Torah, Koran or some other scripture?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Bible
    2) Torah
    3) Koran
    6) Buddhist
    7) Book of Mormon
    8) Tao te ching
    9) Wiccan Bible
    10) Apocrypha
    11) Gita
    12) Scientology
    19) Other
    99) No answer

  • V86 from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
    Optional_Q8d. What is your personal attitude towards members of the following religious groups? Buddhists

    0) Not available
    1) Very positive
    2) Somewhat positive
    3) Neither positive nor negative
    4) Somewhat negative
    5) Very negative
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • V48 from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
    Q20a. What was your mother's religious preference when you were a child? Was it Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, some other religion, or no religion? (IF PROTESTANT) What specific denomination was that? [List in Q.20-Q.23 may be modified to include all major religions in each country. It is strongly recommended that the item on respondent's religion in the demographics use response categories fully compatible with those below.]

    0) No religion
    100) Roman Catholic
    110) Greek Catholic
    200) Protestant
    210) Anglican, Church of England, Episcopal
    220) Baptists
    230) Congregationalists
    240) European Free Church (Anabaptists)
    241) Mennonite
    250) Lutheran, evangelical church
    260) Methodist
    270) Pentecostal
    271) Full Gospel Church of God
    272) Apostolic Faith Mission
    273) Intern Pentecostal Holiness
    274) St John's Apostolic Faith Mission
    276) Zion Christian Church
    280) Presbyterian, Church of Scotland
    281) Free Presbyterian
    282) Jehovah's Witnesses
    283) Church of Christ
    284) New Apostolic
    285) LDS Church, Apostle Twelve
    287) Church of God
    290) Other Protestants (no specific denomination)
    291) Brethren
    292) Mormon
    293) Salvation Army
    294) Assemblies of God
    295) Seventh-day Adventists
    296) Hussites
    297) Unitarians
    299) United Church of Christ
    300) (Eastern) Orthodox
    310) Greek Orthodox
    320) Russian Orthodox
    325) Old Believers in New Zealand (NZ)
    390) Orthodox (no spec. mentioned)
    400) Other Christian groups
    401) Aglipayan
    402) Born Again
    403) Alliance
    407) Christians
    408) Espiritista
    409) Iglesia ni Christo
    410) Phil Independent Church
    413) Bible Christian
    417) Jesus is Alive
    490) Unspecified Christian groups
    500) Jewish
    510) Orthodox Jewish
    520) Conservative Jewish
    530) Reformist Jewish
    590) Jewish Religion general
    600) Islam
    660) Other Muslim religions
    670) Druse
    690) Muslim, Mohammedan, Islam
    700) Buddhists
    701) Specific Buddhist groups
    790) Buddhism general
    800) Hinduism
    820) Sikhism
    901) Shintoism
    902) Taoism
    903) Confucianism
    950) Other East Asian religion
    960) Other religions
    961) Ratana in Philippines (PH)
    970) Other non-Christian religions
    997) NAP, mother not present, no mother
    998) Don't know
    999) No answer

  • V50 from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
    Q21a. What was your father's religious preference when you were a child? Was it Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, some other religion, or no religion? (IF PROTESTANT) What specific denomination was that? [List in Q.20-Q.23 may be modified to include all major religions in each country. It is strongly recommended that the item on respondent's religion in the demographics use response categories fully compatible with those below.]

    0) No religion
    100) Roman Catholic
    110) Greek Catholic
    200) Protestant
    210) Anglican, Church of England, Episcopal
    220) Baptists
    230) Congregationalists
    240) European Free Church (Anabaptists)
    241) Mennonite
    250) Lutheran, evangelical church
    260) Methodist
    270) Pentecostal
    271) Full Gospel Church of God
    272) Apostolic Faith Mission
    273) Intern Pentecostal Holiness
    274) St John's Apostolic Faith Mission
    276) Zion Christian Church
    280) Presbyterian, Church of Scotland
    281) Free Presbyterian
    282) Jehovah's Witnesses
    283) Church of Christ
    284) New Apostolic
    285) LDS Church, Apostle Twelve
    287) Church of God
    290) Other Protestants (no specific denomination)
    291) Brethren
    292) Mormon
    293) Salvation Army
    294) Assemblies of God
    295) Seventh-day Adventists
    296) Hussites
    297) Unitarians
    299) United Church of Christ
    300) (Eastern) Orthodox
    310) Greek Orthodox
    320) Russian Orthodox
    325) Old Believers in Netherlands (NL)
    390) Orthodox (no spec. mentioned)
    400) Other Christian groups
    401) Aglipayan
    402) Born again
    403) Alliance
    407) Christians
    408) Espiritista
    409) Iglesia ni Christo
    410) Phil Independent Church
    413) Bible Christian
    417) Jesus is Alive
    490) Unspecified Christian groups
    500) Jewish
    510) Orthodox Jewish
    520) Conservative Jewish
    530) Reformist Jewish
    590) Jewish religion general
    600) Islam
    660) Other Muslim religions
    670) Druse
    690) Muslim, Mohammedan, Islam
    700) Buddhists
    701) Specific Buddhist groups
    790) Buddhism general
    800) Hinduism
    820) Sikhism
    901) Shintoism
    902) Taoism
    903) Confucianism
    950) Other East Asian religion
    960) Other religions
    961) Ratana in Philippines (PH)
    970) Other non-Christian religions
    971) Spiritual philosophy of life, anthroposophy in New Zealand (NZ)
    997) NAP, father not present, no father
    998) Don't know
    999) No answer

  • V52 from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
    Q22a. What religion, if any, were you raised in? Was it Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, some other religion, or no religion? (IF PROTESTANT) What specific denomination was that? [List in Q.20-Q.23 may be modified to include all major religions in each country. It is strongly recommended that the item on respondent's religion in the demographics use response categories fully compatible with those below.]

    0) No religion
    100) Roman Catholic
    110) Greek Catholic
    200) Protestant
    210) Anglican, Church of England, Episcopal
    220) Baptists
    230) Congregationalists
    240) European Free Church (Anabaptists)
    241) Mennonite
    250) Lutheran, evangelical church
    260) Methodist
    270) Pentecostal
    271) Full Gospel Church of God
    272) Apostolic Faith Mission
    273) Intern Pentecostal Holiness
    274) St John's Apostolic Faith Mission
    276) Zion Christian Church
    280) Presbyterian, Church of Scotland
    281) Free Presbyterian
    282) Jehovah's Witnesses
    283) Church of Christ
    284) New Apostolic
    285) LDS Church, Apostle Twelve
    287) Church of God
    290) Other Protestants (no specific denomination)
    291) Brethren
    292) Mormon
    293) Salvation Army
    294) Assemblies of God
    295) Seventh-day Adventists
    296) Hussites
    297) Unitarians
    299) United Church of Christ
    300) (Eastern) Orthodox
    310) Greek Orthodox
    320) Russian Orthodox
    325) Old Believers in Netherlands (NL)
    390) Orthodox (no spec. mentioned)
    400) Other Christian groups
    401) Aglipayan
    402) Born again
    403) Alliance
    407) Christians
    408) Espiritista
    409) Iglesia ni Christo
    410) Phil Independent Church
    413) Bible Christian
    417) Jesus is Alive
    490) Unspecified Christian groups
    500) Jewish
    510) Orthodox Jewish
    520) Conservative Jewish
    530) Reformist Jewish
    590) Jewish religion general
    600) Islam
    660) Other Muslim religions
    670) Druse
    690) Muslim, Mohammedan, Islam
    700) Buddhists
    701) Specific Buddhist groups
    790) Buddhism general
    800) Hinduism
    820) Sikhism
    901) Shintoism
    902) Taoism
    903) Confucianism
    950) Other East Asian religion
    960) Other religions
    961) Ratana in Philippines (PH)
    970) Other non-Christian religions
    971) Spiritual philosophy of life, anthroposophy in New Zealand (NZ)
    998) Don't know
    999) No answer

  • RELIG from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
    Religious denomination

    0) No religion
    100) Roman Catholic
    110) Greek Catholic
    200) Protestant
    210) Anglican, Church of England, Episcopal, Church of Ireland
    220) Baptists
    230) Congregationalists
    240) European Free Church (Anabaptists)
    241) Mennonite
    250) Lutheran, evangelical church
    260) Methodist
    270) Pentecostal
    271) Full Gospel Church of God
    272) Apostolic Faith Mission
    273) Intern Pentecostal Holiness
    274) St John's Apostolic Faith Mission
    275) Nazareth Baptist Church
    276) Zion Christian Church
    280) Presbyterian, Church of Scotland
    281) Free Presbyterian
    282) Jehovah's Witnesses
    283) Church of Christ
    284) New Apostolic
    285) LDS Church, Apostle Twelve
    286) Church of God and Saints of Christ
    287) Church of God
    290) Other Protestants (no spec. denom.)
    291) Brethren
    292) Mormon
    293) Salvation Army
    294) Assemblies of God
    295) Seventh-day Adventists
    296) Hussites
    297) Unitarians
    299) United Church of Christ
    300) (Eastern) Orthodox
    310) Greek Orthodox
    320) Russian Orthodox
    321) UA: Ukrainian Orthodox Church - Moscow Patriarchate
    322) UA: Ukrainian Orthodox Church - Kyiv Patriarchate
    323) UA: Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church
    325) LV: Old Believers
    390) Orthodox (no spec. mentioned)
    400) Other Christian groups
    401) PH: Aglipayan
    402) Born Again
    407) Christians
    408) Espiritista
    409) PH: Iglesia ni Christo
    417) Jesus is Alive
    490) Unspecified Christian groups
    500) Jewish
    510) Orthodox Jewish
    520) Conservative Jewish
    530) Reformist Jewish
    590) Jewish religion general
    600) Islam
    660) Other Muslim
    670) Druse
    690) Muslim, Mohammedan, Islam
    700) Buddhists
    701) Specific Buddhist groups
    790) Buddhism general
    800) Hinduism
    820) Sikhism
    890) Hinduism general
    900) Other Asian religion
    901) Shintoism
    902) Taoism
    950) Other East Asian religion
    960) Other religions
    961) NZ: Ratana, Ringatu
    962) US: Native American
    963) UY: Afro brazilian religion
    970) Other non-Christian religions
    971) NL: Spiritual philosophy of life, anthroposophy
    996) NL, UY: I believe in God, but I do not feel close to any religion
    997) Refused
    998) Don't know
    999) No answer

  • V54 from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
    Q23a. IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY MARRIED OR LIVING AS MARRIED, ANSWER Q23/IF YOU ARE NOT CURRENTLY MARRIED OR LIVING AS MARRIED, GO TO Q24. What is your husband's/wife's religious preference? Is it Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, some other religion, or no religion? (IF PROTESTANT) What specific denomination is that? [List in Q.20-Q.23 may be modified to include all major religions in each country. It is strongly recommended that the item on respondent's religion in the demographics use response categories fully compatible with those below.]

    0) No religion
    100) Roman Catholic
    110) Greek Catholic
    200) Protestant
    210) Anglican, Church of England, Episcopal
    220) Baptists
    230) Congregationalists
    240) European Free Church (Anabaptists)
    241) Mennonite
    250) Lutheran, evangelical church
    260) Methodist
    270) Pentecostal
    271) Full Gospel Church of God
    272) Apostolic Faith Mission
    273) Intern Pentecostal Holiness
    274) St John's Apostolic Faith Mission
    275) Nazareth Baptist Church
    276) Zion Christian Church
    280) Presbyterian, Church of Scotland
    281) Free Presbyterian
    282) Jehovah's Witnesses
    283) Church of Christ
    284) New Apostolic
    285) LDS Church, Apostle Twelve
    286) Church of God a Saints of Christ
    287) Church of God
    290) Other Protestants (no specific denomination)
    291) Brethren
    292) Mormon
    293) Salvation Army
    294) Assemblies of God
    295) Seventh-day Adventists
    296) Hussites
    297) Unitarians
    299) United Church of Christ
    300) (Eastern) Orthodox
    310) Greek Orthodox
    320) Russian Orthodox
    325) Old Believers in Netherlands (NL)
    390) Orthodox (no spec. mentioned)
    400) Other Christian groups
    401) Aglipayan
    402) Born again
    403) Alliance
    404) Dating Daan
    406) Jesus is Lord
    407) Christians
    408) Espiritista
    409) Iglesia ni Christo
    410) Phil Independent Church
    411) Iglesia Filipina Ind in South Africa (ZA)
    490) Unspecified Christian groups
    500) Jewish
    510) Orthodox Jewish
    520) Conservative Jewish
    530) Reformist Jewish
    590) Jewish religion general
    600) Islam
    660) Other Muslim religions
    670) Druse
    690) Muslim, Mohammedan, Islam
    700) Buddhists
    701) Specific Buddhist groups
    790) Buddhism general
    800) Hinduism
    820) Sikhism
    900) Other Asian religion
    901) Shintoism
    902) Taoism
    950) Other East Asian religion
    960) Other religions
    961) Ratana in Philippines (PH)
    970) Other non-Christian religions
    971) Spiritual philosophy of life, anthroposophy in New Zealand (NZ)
    997) Not applicable, no partner (code 2 in COHAB) in IT US, not married (code 2-5 in MARITAL)
    998) Don't know
    999) No answer

  • BUDDHIST from Data from the ARDA National Profiles, 2005 Update: Religion Indexes, Adherents and Other Data
    Buddhist (WCD 2005)

  • RELRECOD from Data from the ARDA National Profiles, 2005 Update: Religion Indexes, Adherents and Other Data
    Country's largest religion by percentage

    0) Atheism
    1) Christian unspecified
    2) Catholic
    3) Orthodox Christian
    4) Protestant
    5) Anglican/Episcopal
    6) Muslim Unspecified
    7) Muslim Sunni
    8) Mushlim Shi'a
    9) Muslim (other)
    10) Jewish
    11) Animist/Indigenous/Tradition
    12) Hindu Unspecified
    13) Hindu (other)
    14) Buddhist unspecified
    15) Buddhist (other)
    16) Tao
    17) Shinto
    18) Oriental (not Tao or Shinto)
    19) Other (please specify)
    999) Info not given or missing

  • PA22 from National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home, In-School, and Parent Questionnaire Data, Wave I
    What is your religion?

    1) Adventist
    2) AME, AME Zion, CME
    3) Assemblies of God
    5) Baptist
    6) Buddhist
    7) Catholic
    8) Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
    9) Christian Science
    10) Congregational
    11) Eastern Orthodox
    12) Episcopal
    13) Friends/Quaker
    14) Hindu
    15) Holiness
    16) Islam, Moslem, Muslim
    17) Jehovah's Witnesses
    18) Jewish (Conservative, Reformed, Orthodox, or Reconstructionist)
    19) Latter-day Saints (Mormon)
    20) Lutheran
    21) Methodist
    23) Other Protestant
    24) Other religion
    25) Pentecostal
    26) Presbyterian
    27) Unitarian
    28) None [Skip to PA27A]
    96) Respondent refused to answer.

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