Enter Search Term:   

  How much do you trust President Bush?

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  Jonathan Edwards Preaches 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God': Jonathan Edwards's sermon "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" (1741) was one of the foundational texts of the First Great Awakening.
  Vanderbilt University Founded: In 1873, Vanderbilt University was founded in Nashville, Tennessee with the initial goal of training local Methodist ministers.

                       [Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Timelines)


  Trust In People, Level of: How much does respondent trust people, in general?
  Science, Attitude towards/Trust in: Does the respondent trust science? Does the respondent feel positively towards science?
  Mormons, View of: What is the respondent's attitude about Mormons? This could include a variety of issues, including whether or not the respondent trusts Mormons, if the respondent would find a Mormon neighbor acceptable, etc.

                       [Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in Measurement Concepts)


  Religious membership report for New York County, NY
  Religious membership report for District Of Columbia County, DC
  Religious membership report for Fairfield County, CT
  Religious membership report for New Haven County, CT
  Religious membership report for New Castle County, DE
  Religious membership report for Suffolk County, MA
  Religious membership report for Madison County, NC
  Religious membership report for Mecklenburg County, NC
  Religious membership report for Jefferson County, AL
  Religious membership report for Cook County, IL

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-12]  (of 12 total matches in RCMS County Reports)



Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
 
Does religion breed trust? A cross-national study of the effects of religious involvement, religious faith, and religious context on social trust.
Dingemans, Ellen, and Erik van ingen (2015)
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 54:4: 739-755.
Analyzes 2008 European Values study data. At the micro level, integration into religious communities furthers trust; religious socialization & salience lower it. At the macro level, Protestantism & religious diversity further trust.
Associated Search Terms: Dimensions of religiosity; Europe; Pluralism; Salience; Trust; Levels of inclusiveness
 
Does a nation's religious composition affect generalized trust? The role of religious heterogeneity and the percent religious.
Olson, Daniel V.A., and Miao Li (2015)
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 54:4: 756-773.
Combines international surveys for a sample from 69 nations & 77,405 respondents. Nations that are both highly religiously diverse & highly religious have lower average levels of trust.
Associated Search Terms: Religiosity, collective; Trust; Pluralism
 
Generating trust in congregations: Engagement, exchange, and social networks.
Seymour, Jeffrey M., Michael R. Welch, Karen Monique Gregg, and Jessica Collett (2014)
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 53:1: 130-144.
Analyzes 2006 interview data (Wave 1, Portraits of American Life Study) from adult Americans. Closeness of ties to religious leaders, interpersonal ties within congregations, & giving & receiving aid predict trust.
Associated Search Terms: Congregation; Trust; Network
 
Religious coping: The role of religion in attenuating the effect of sexual victimization of college women on trust.
Tamburello, Jeffrey A., Kyle Irwin, and Martha Gault Sherman (2014)
Review of Religious Research 56:4: 581-595.
Analyzes 1990-95 panel data from a convenience sample of undergraduate women in a state-supported American university. Religious participation can mitigate the negative effects of sexual victimization on generalized trust.
Associated Search Terms: Students, undergraduate; Trust; Sexual harassment; Sexual assault; Sexual advances; Panel study; Coping; Practice
 
Religiosity, trust and tolerance in times of recession. The cases of Spain and Greece.
Stathopoulou, Theoni, and Anastasia Kostaki (2014)
In N.P. Petropoulos and G.O. Tsobanoglou (eds.) The Debt Crisis in the Eurozone: Social Impacts. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, U.K.: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Associated Search Terms: Trust; Economic; Tolerance
 
Religion, Religiosity, and Democratic Values. a Comparative Perspective of Islamic and Non-Islamic Societies.
Bayat, Mohammad Reza (2014)
Leiden: Brill.
Uses multi-country survey data. At the societal & individual levels, Islam, as well as other religions, correlates with trust of institutions, acceptance of democratic values, & acceptance of free-market economics.
Associated Search Terms: Economic; Democracy; Trust; Islam
 
"I doubt. Therefore, I believe": Facing uncertainty and belief in the making.
Lamine, Anne-Sophie (2014)
In Gladys Ganiel, Heidemarie Winkel, and Christophe Monnot (eds.) Religion in Times of Crisis. Leiden: Brill, pp. 72-90.
Theoretical statement of three ideal type modalities of belief relevant to Western Europe: Belief as aspiration & trust; belief as self-discipline or believing with body; belief as experience of being together with other believers. Illustrations are provided.
Associated Search Terms: Ideal type; Trust; Discipline; Communitas; Belief
 
Religious faith and the market economy: A survey on faith and trust of Catholic entrereneurs in China.
Gao, Shining, and Fengang Yang (2014)
In Jürgen von Hagen and Michael Welker (eds.) Money as God?: The Monetization of the market and Its Impact on Religion, Politics, Law and Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 339-361.
Associated Search Terms: Business people; Catholic, China; China
 
Social trust and religion in Sweden: Theological belief versus social organization.
Lundåsen, Susanne Wallman, and Lars Trägårdh (2013)
In Joep de Hart, Paul Dekker, and Loek Halman (eds.) Religion and Civil Society in Europe. Dordrecht: Springer, pp. 109-124.
Analyzes 2009 Swedish survey data. Individual levels of trust correlate positively with community levels of church attendance, & trust correlates positively with volunteering in parishes.
Associated Search Terms: Trust; Sweden; Organization; Lutheran, Sweden; Levels of inclusiveness; Contextual effects
 
Church affiliation and trust in the state: Survey data evidence from four Nordic countries.
Kasselstrand Isabella, and Mor Kandlik Eltanani (2013)
Nordic Journal of Religion and Society 26: 103-119.
Associated Search Terms: Trust; State; Membership

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-70]  (of 70 total matches in Citations)


 
Baylor Religion Survey, Wave II (2007):
The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
Collected: 2007, Uploaded 5/31/2011
 
Baylor Religion Survey, Wave III (2010):
The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
Collected: 2010, Uploaded 3/21/2016
 
Baylor Religion Survey, Wave II (2007) - Instructional Dataset:
This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2007 Baylor Religion Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
Collected: 2007, Uploaded 10/9/2014
 
International Social Survey Program: Religion II, 1998:
Started in 1984, the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) is an ongoing program of cross-national collaboration. The program develops modules that deal with areas of interest in the social sciences. These modules supplement regular national surveys. The 1998 religion module includes data from Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, the Slovakian Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Like the 1991 International Social Survey Program: Religion I, this survey covers three main topic areas. The first addresses general attitudes toward various social issues including government, sex, abortion, male and female issues, and personal trust. Secondly, the module addresses religion, including the role of religious leaders, attitudes about God, attendance, miracles, and the Bible. Finally, the module has demographic information including age, sex, education, and occupation.
Funded By: The research organization in each country funds all of its own costs and the merging of the data into a cross-national data set is performed by the Zentralarchiv fuer Empirische Sozialforschung, University of Cologne.
Collected: 2001, Uploaded 3/26/2006
 
Religion and Politics Survey, 2000 :
The religion and politics survey is part of the larger Public Role of Mainline Protestantism Project, which is coordinated through Princeton University's Survey Research Center. The survey addresses respondents' views on political, social, and religious issues, their political actions, beliefs, and affiliations, and their religious actions, beliefs, and affiliations.
Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts
Collected: 2000, Uploaded 4/24/2002
 
Spirit and Power: A 10-Country Survey of Pentecostals:
This multi-country survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys were conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample in each country.
Funded By: Produced by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts and The John Templeton Foundation .
Collected: 2006, Uploaded 4/23/2008
 
World's Muslims Data Set, 2012:
“Between October 2011 and November 2012, Pew Research Center, with generous funding from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John Templeton Foundation, conducted a public opinion survey involving more than 30,000 face-to-face interviews in 26 countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. The survey asked people to describe their religious beliefs and practices, and sought to gauge respondents; knowledge of and attitudes toward other faiths. It aimed to assess levels of political and economic satisfaction, concerns about crime, corruption and extremism, positions on issues such as abortion and polygamy, and views of democracy, religious law and the place of women in society.

"Although the surveys were nationally representative in most countries, the primary goal of the survey was to gauge and compare beliefs and attitudes of Muslims. The findings for Muslim respondents are summarized in the Religion & Public Life Project’s reports The World’s Muslims: Unity and Diversity and The World’s Muslims: Religion, Politics and Society, which are available at www.pewresearch.org. […] This dataset only contains data for Muslim respondents in the countries surveyed. Please note that this codebook is meant as a guide to the dataset, and is not the survey questionnaire.” (2012 Pew Religion Worlds Muslims Codebook)
Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts The John Templeton Foundation
Collected: 2012, Uploaded 3/21/2016
 
Baylor Religion Survey, Wave I (2005):
The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
Collected: 2005, Uploaded 8/22/2006
 
Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Brazil:
This file of respondents in Brazil is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Brazil were conducted by the research firm, Research International Brazil, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.
Funded By: Produced by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts and The John Templeton Foundation .
Collected: 2006, Uploaded 5/19/2008
 
Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Chile:
This file of respondents in Chile is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Chile were conducted by the research firm, MORI Chile, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.
Funded By: Produced by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts and The John Templeton Foundation .
Collected: 2006, Uploaded 5/19/2008

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-34]  (of 34 total matches in the Data Archive Files)


 
INFOBIZ from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: business and industry?

0) Inapplicable
1) A great deal of trust
2) Quite a lot of trust
3) Some trust
4) Not much trust
5) Hardly any trust
8) Don't know

 
INFOGRN from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: environmental groups?

0) Inapplicable
1) A great deal of trust
2) Quite a lot of trust
3) Some trust
4) Not much trust
5) Hardly any trust
8) Don't know

 
INFOGOVT from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: government departments?

0) Inapplicable
1) A great deal of trust
2) Quite a lot of trust
3) Some trust
4) Not much trust
5) Hardly any trust
8) Don't know

 
INFONEWS from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: newspapers?

0) Inapplicable
1) A great deal of trust
2) Quite a lot of trust
3) Some trust
4) Not much trust
5) Hardly any trust
8) Don't know

 
INFOTV from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: radio or TV programs?

0) Inapplicable
1) A great deal of trust
2) Quite a lot of trust
3) Some trust
4) Not much trust
5) Hardly any trust
8) Don't know

 
INFOCOL from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: university research centers?

0) Inapplicable
1) A great deal of trust
2) Quite a lot of trust
3) Some trust
4) Not much trust
5) Hardly any trust
8) Don't know

 
V13 from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
Q7. Generally speaking, would you say that people can be trusted or that you can't be too careful in dealing with people?

1) People can almost always be trusted
2) People can usually be trusted
3) You usually can't be too careful in dealing with people
4) You almost always can't be too careful in dealing with people
8) Can't choose
9) No answer

 
CANTRUST from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
Generally speaking, would you say that people can be trusted or that you can't be too careful in dealing with people?

0) Inapplicable
1) People can almost always be trusted
2) People can usually be trusted
3) You usually can't be too careful in dealing with people
4) You almost always can't be too careful in dealing with people
8) Can't choose
9) No answer

 
TRUST from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
Generally speaking, would you say that most people can be trusted or that you can't be too careful in life?

0) Inapplicable
1) Most people can be trusted.
2) You can't be too careful in life.
3) Depends
8) Don't know

 
TRUST from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
Generally speaking, would you say that most people can be trusted or that you can't be too careful in dealing with people?

0) Inapplicable
1) Most people can be trusted
2) Can't be too careful
3) Depends
8) Don't know
9) No answer

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 1052 total matches in Data Archive)


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