QuickStats
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in QuickStats)
Timeline
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Timelines)
Measurements
  • Trust In People, Level of: How much does respondent trust people, in general?
  • Science, Attitude towards/Trust in: Does the respondent trust science? Does the respondent feel positively towards science?
  • Mormons, View of: What is the respondent's attitude about Mormons? This could include a variety of issues, including whether or not the respondent trusts Mormons, if the respondent would find a Mormon neighbor acceptable, etc.
  • Distrust of People Scale: This scale was created in 1964 as part of the Anti-Semitism in the United States Survey. Higher scores indicate more trust of people. Note: This scale wasn't a previously established scale, but was created when the survey was created (PI's: Charles Glock, Gertrude Selznick, Rodney Stark, Stephen Steinberg).
  • Index of Social Trust, 2000: This scale was created in 2000 as part of the Social Capital Benchmark Survey. Note: This scale wasn't a previously established scale, but was created when the survey was created (PI: Robert D. Putnam, Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University).
  • Index of Racial Trust, 2000: This scale was created in 2000 as part of the Social Capital Benchmark Survey. This scale wasn't a previously established scale, but was created when the survey was created (PI: Robert D. Putnam, Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University).
[Viewing Matches 1-6]  (of 6 total matches in Measurement Concepts)
ARDA Dictionary
  • Fowler’s Stages of Faith:Similar to Piaget’s stages of cognitive development, theologian James Fowler (1991) suggested that personal religious faith also develops in stages. Fowler’s seven stages are: 1) primal faith (infancy); 2) intuitive/projective faith (early childhood); 3) mythical/literal faith (elementary school); 4) synthetic/conventional faith (early adolescence); 5) individuative/reflective faith (late adolescence/early adulthood); 6) conjuctive faith (midlife or beyond); and 7) universalizing faith (unspecified age). The first stage of primal faith is a stage where individuals, often at infancy, learn emotional trust based on contact and care that sets up the foundation for faith. The final stage of universalizing faith allows the individual to feel one with God. The complexity of Fowler’s conceptualizations makes it difficult to empirically test his theory.
  • Marital Instability, Religion and:Marital instability is ongoing conflict in marriage either because of communication problems, disagreements about parenting or gender roles, financial difficulties, lack of trust, or presence of alcohol or drug problems (Koenig et al. 2012: 256). Lack of marital happiness, infidelity, abuse and divorce represent aspects of marital instability. It can arise out of unrealistic cultural expectations for marriage (Cherlin 2009; Nock 1987), marital problems from parents (Amato and Patterson 2017; Whitton et al. 2008), economic instability (Nunley and Seals 2010) and other reasons. Koenig and colleagues (2012) examined 79 quantitative studies on religion and marital instability and found that 87 percent of the studies found a negative relationship between religion and marital instability (e.g., divorce, abuse, infidelity, etc.), meaning as religiousness increased, marital instability decreased. Given how religion is associated with positive coping, marital commitment and proscriptions against divorce, it operates as a protective factor against marital problems. The exception, however, is when spouses have different religious backgrounds, which tends to increase marital instability (Curtis and Ellison 2002; Vaaler, Ellison and Powers 2009).
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Secularity and irreligion in cross-national context: A nonlinear approach.
    Kasselstrand, Isabella (2019)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 58:3: 626-642.

    Analyzes survey data from multiple sources on nations' % non-belief in God, % lacking any trust in religious organizations, & % self-defined atheists.

    Associated Search Terms: Atheist
  • Local religious subcultures and generalized social trust in the United States.
    Marshall, Joey, and Daniel V.A. Olson (2018)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57:3: 473-494.

    Analyzes 1984-2010 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data from 256 metropolitan areas. Individuals' trust in others is lower n highly Evangelical areas & higher in highly mainline Protestant & Catholic areas.

    Associated Search Terms: Ecology; Evangelical, U.S.A.; Protestant (mainline), U.S.A..; Trust; Urban; Catholic, U.S.A.
  • Cultural authority in comparative context: A multilevel analysis of trust in science and religion.
    O'Brien, Timothy L., and Shiri Noy (2018)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57:3: 495-513.

    Analyzes 2008 International Social Survey program data. Using nations as context variables, finds individuals' trust in science & in religion inversely related, especially in secular societies.

    Associated Search Terms: Contextual effects; Science
  • Joining the Choir: Religious Membership and Social Trust Among Transnational Ghanaians.
    Manglos-Weber, Nicolette D. (2018)
    New York: Oxford University Press.

    Associated Search Terms: Trust; Assimilation; Competition; Ghanaian Americans; Migrant; Participant observation; Pentecostal, U.S.A.; Transnational
  • Opposing ends of the spectrum: Exploring trust in scientific and religious authorities.
    Cacciatore, Michael A., Nick Browning, Dietram A. Scheufele, Dominique Brossard, Michael A. Xenos, and Elizabeth A. Corely (2018)
    Public Understanding of Science 27:1: 11-28.

    Associated Search Terms: Science
  • The effects of Protestant theological conservatism and trust on environmental cooperation.
    Irwin, Kyle, and Brandon C. Martinez (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:1: 199-212.

    Analyzes 2010 General Social survey (USA) data; conservative Protestantism is characterized by lower levels of trust, which in turn undermine environmental cooperation.

    Associated Search Terms: Trust; Conservative, U.S.A.; Environmentalism
  • Prosocial skeptics: Skepticism and generalized trust.
    Loveland, Matthew, Alexander G. Capella, and India Maisonet (2017)
    Critical Research on Religion 5:3: 251-265.

    Associated Search Terms: Atheist; Trust
  • Judgmental God image, social embeddedness, and social trust among the highly religious in the United States.
    Henderson. W. Matthew, Brittany Fitz, and F. Carson Mencken (2017)
    Journal of Contemporary Religion 32:1: 1-14.

    Associated Search Terms: Communality; God, image of; Trust
  • Trust at Work: A Study on Faith and Trust of Protestant Entrepreneurs in China
    Tong, Joy K.C., and Fenggang Yang (2016)
    Religions 7(12), 136; doi:10.3390/rel7120136 (online)

    Based on in-depth interviews; religiosity facilitates trust.

    Associated Search Terms: Business people; China; Protestant, China; Trust
  • Does religion breed trust? A cross-national study of the effects of religious involvement, religious faith, and religious context on social trust.
    Dingemans, Ellen, and Erik van ingen (2015)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 54:4: 739-755.

    Analyzes 2008 European Values study data. At the micro level, integration into religious communities furthers trust; religious socialization & salience lower it. At the macro level, Protestantism & religious diversity further trust.

    Associated Search Terms: Europe; Pluralism; Salience; Trust; Dimensions of religiosity; Levels of inclusiveness
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-82]  (of 82 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave II (2007):
    The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 5/31/2011
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave III (2010):
    The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 3/21/2016
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave II (2007) - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2007 Baylor Religion Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

    The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 10/9/2014
  • International Social Survey Program: Religion II, 1998:
    Started in 1984, the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) is an ongoing program of cross-national collaboration. The program develops modules that deal with areas of interest in the social sciences. These modules supplement regular national surveys. The 1998 religion module includes data from Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, the Slovakian Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Like the 1991 International Social Survey Program: Religion I, this survey covers three main topic areas. The first addresses general attitudes toward various social issues including government, sex, abortion, male and female issues, and personal trust. Secondly, the module addresses religion, including the role of religious leaders, attitudes about God, attendance, miracles, and the Bible. Finally, the module has demographic information including age, sex, education, and occupation.
    Funded By: The research organization in each country funds all of its own costs and the merging of the data into a cross-national data set is performed by the Zentralarchiv fuer Empirische Sozialforschung, University of Cologne.
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 3/26/2006
  • Global Restrictions on Religion, 2007-2016:
    In December 2009, Pew Research Center released “Global Restrictions on Religion,” the first in a series of annual reports on a data-coding project that seeks to measure levels of government restrictions on religion and social hostilities involving religion around the world.

    The reports use two indexes to rate nearly 200 countries and self-governing territories on their levels of restrictions and hostilities. The Government Restrictions Index (GRI) is based on 20 indicators of ways that national and local governments restrict religion, including through coercion and force. The Social Hostilities Index (SHI) is based on 13 indicators of ways in which private individuals and social groups infringe upon religious beliefs and practices, including religiously biased crimes, mob violence and efforts to stop particular religious groups from growing or operating. The reports include data on the number and types of documented incidents of religion-related violence, including terrorism and armed conflict.

    As of June 2018, Pew Research had published nine reports on global restrictions on religion, analyzing a total of 10 years’ worth of data (the first two reports covered a total of three years, from 2007 to 2009). The data are presented as a semiwide-format dataset, in which each row is a country-year observation (for example, “Afghanistan, 2007”). The columns contain all of the variables presented in Pew Research Center’s annual reports on restrictions on religion, as well as some additional variables analyzed in separate studies. The dataset currently contains data from 2007 through 2016.
    Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2016, Uploaded 6/21/2019
  • Religion and Politics Survey, 2000 :
    The religion and politics survey is part of the larger Public Role of Mainline Protestantism Project, which is coordinated through Princeton University's Survey Research Center. The survey addresses respondents' views on political, social, and religious issues, their political actions, beliefs, and affiliations, and their religious actions, beliefs, and affiliations.
    Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 4/24/2002
  • Spirit and Power: A 10-Country Survey of Pentecostals:
    This multi-country survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys were conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample in each country.
    Funded By: Produced by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts and The John Templeton Foundation .
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 4/23/2008
  • World's Muslims Data Set, 2012:
    "Between October 2011 and November 2012, Pew Research Center, with generous funding from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John Templeton Foundation, conducted a public opinion survey involving more than 30,000 face-to-face interviews in 26 countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. The survey asked people to describe their religious beliefs and practices, and sought to gauge respondents; knowledge of and attitudes toward other faiths. It aimed to assess levels of political and economic satisfaction, concerns about crime, corruption and extremism, positions on issues such as abortion and polygamy, and views of democracy, religious law and the place of women in society.

    "Although the surveys were nationally representative in most countries, the primary goal of the survey was to gauge and compare beliefs and attitudes of Muslims. The findings for Muslim respondents are summarized in the Religion & Public Life Project's reports The World's Muslims: Unity and Diversity and The World's Muslims: Religion, Politics and Society, which are available at www.pewresearch.org. [...] This dataset only contains data for Muslim respondents in the countries surveyed. Please note that this codebook is meant as a guide to the dataset, and is not the survey questionnaire." (2012 Pew Religion Worlds Muslims Codebook)
    Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 3/21/2016
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave I (2005):
    The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.
    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 8/22/2006
  • Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Brazil:
    This file of respondents in Brazil is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Brazil were conducted by the research firm, Research International Brazil, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.
    Funded By: Produced by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts and The John Templeton Foundation .
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 5/19/2008
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-39]  (of 39 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • INFOBIZ from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: business and industry?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) A great deal of trust
    2) Quite a lot of trust
    3) Some trust
    4) Not much trust
    5) Hardly any trust
    8) Don't know

  • INFOGRN from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: environmental groups?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) A great deal of trust
    2) Quite a lot of trust
    3) Some trust
    4) Not much trust
    5) Hardly any trust
    8) Don't know

  • INFOGOVT from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: government departments?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) A great deal of trust
    2) Quite a lot of trust
    3) Some trust
    4) Not much trust
    5) Hardly any trust
    8) Don't know

  • INFONEWS from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: newspapers?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) A great deal of trust
    2) Quite a lot of trust
    3) Some trust
    4) Not much trust
    5) Hardly any trust
    8) Don't know

  • INFOTV from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: radio or TV programs?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) A great deal of trust
    2) Quite a lot of trust
    3) Some trust
    4) Not much trust
    5) Hardly any trust
    8) Don't know

  • INFOCOL from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    How much trust do you have in each of the following groups to give you correct information about causes of pollution: university research centers?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) A great deal of trust
    2) Quite a lot of trust
    3) Some trust
    4) Not much trust
    5) Hardly any trust
    8) Don't know

  • TRCOURTS from General Social Survey, 2018
    Using the following scale ranging from 0 to 10, where 0 means 'No trust at all' and 10 means 'Complete trust', please indicate how much trust you personally have in America's courts?

    -1) Not applicable
    0) No trust
    1) 1
    2) 2
    3) 3
    4) 4
    5) 5
    6) 6
    7) 7
    8) 8
    9) 9
    10) Complete trust
    98) Don't know
    99) No answer

  • TRBIGBUS from General Social Survey, 2018
    Using the following scale ranging from 0 to 10, where 0 means 'No trust at all' and 10 means 'Complete trust', please indicate how much trust you personally have in major private companies in America?

    -1) Not applicable
    0) No trust
    1) 1
    2) 2
    3) 3
    4) 4
    5) 5
    6) 6
    7) 7
    8) 8
    9) 9
    10) Complete trust
    98) Don't know
    99) No answer

  • JS6B from Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2001
    Do you have a great deal, some, only a little or no trust in the U.S. Supreme Court?

    1) A great deal
    2) Some
    3) Only a little
    4) No trust
    8) Don't know
    9) Refused

  • JS6C from Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2001
    Do you have a great deal, some, only a little or no trust in the University of Nebraska?

    1) A great deal
    2) Some
    3) Only a little
    4) No trust
    8) Don't know
    9) Refused

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 1199 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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