Timeline
  • Emergent Church: The Emergent (or "Emerging") Church Movement gained traction in the 1990s, as groups sought to make Christianity "relevant" to a postmodern world.
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Timelines)
ARDA Dictionary
  • Ozorak’s Polarization Hypothesis:Using a social-cognitive model of religious socialization processes, Ozorak (1989) noted that more religious adolescents tended to increase in religiosity, whereas less religious adolescents tended to swift away from religion. In other words, the religious distance between more and less religious young adults tends to increase over time, leading to polarizing religious tendencies. This hypothesis has been reproduced in different countries (Tamminen 1991) and among college students (Madsen and Vernon 1983).
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health):The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a nationally representative study that follows a sample of adolescents (Wave 1: 1994-1995) as they grow into adults. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents’ social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. As of 2018, four waves have already been collected and made publicly available, with the fifth wave finishing up data collection from 2016-2018. Because Add Health has a number of religion and health survey items, it has been a valuable data source in the study of health and religion (see Nooney 2005; Rostosky, Regnerus and Wright 2003). To download Add Health datasets from the ARDA’s Data Archive, click here .
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Teaching Tools
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Teaching Tools)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • The Twentysomething Soul: Understanding the Religious and Secular Lives of American Young Adults.
    Clydesdale, Timothy T., and Kathleen Garces-Foley (2019)
    New York: Oxford University Press.

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults
  • What God has joined together: Family formation and religion among young adults.
    Denton, Melinda Lundquist, and Jeremy E. Uecker (2018)
    Review of Religious Research 60:1: 1-22.

    Analyzes survey data from waves 3 (18-24 years old) & 4 (23-28 yrs.) from the National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.). Marriage with children is associated with attendance, & marriage with salience.

    Associated Search Terms: Panel study; Young adults; Practice; Marriage; Family; Salience
  • “You’re Throwing Your Life Away”: Sanctioning of Early Marital Timelines by Religion and Social Class.
    Tevington, Patricia (2018)
    Social Inclusion (ISSN: 2183–2803) 6:2: 140-150.

    Based on interviews with Evangelical young adult Americans. They face social disapproval of marriage at earlier ages than non-Evangelicals, both from non-Evangelical peers and from their families.

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults; Evangelical, U.S.A.; Marriage
  • "Dare to be different": How religious groups frame and enact appropriate sexuality and gender norms among young adults.
    Williams, Rhys H., Courtney Ann Irby, R. Stephen Warner. (2018)
    Sociological Studies of Children and Youth 23: 1-22.

    Associated Search Terms: Sexuality; Socialization; Sexual norms; Gender
  • Losing or choosing faith: Mother loss and religious change.
    Wilkinson, Renae (2018)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57:4: 758-778.

    Analyzes waves 1 & 4 of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult health (USA) data (1994-2008). Death of mother during transition to adulthood is inversely associated with attendance but positively associated with salience. There is an inverse relationship between deceased mother's religiosity & prayer frequency.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Family; Panel study; Practice; Prayer; Salience; Young adults
  • Religiosity, marijuana use, and binge drinking: A test of the moral community hypothesis.
    Rivera, Craig J., Timothy R. Lauger, and Michael A. Cretacci (2018)
    Sociology of Religion 79:3: 356-378.

    Analyzes 2007-08 National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.) data. Integration into a micro moral community strengthens the inverse association of religiosity with binge drinking & marijuana use.

    Associated Search Terms: Moral community; Young adults; Religiosity; Network; Marijuana; Deviance/social control; Contextual effects; Adolescents; Alcohol
  • Who wears the Hijab? Predictors of veiling in greater Jakarta.
    Utomo, Ariane, Anna Reimondos, Peter McDonald, Iwu Utomo, and Terence Hull (2018)
    Review of Religious Research 60:4: 477-501.

    Analyzes survey data from Jakarta area women. Veiling is associated with religiosity &, among the younger women, educational attainment.

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults; Women; Religiosity; Islam, Indonesia; Education; Clothing; Indonesia, Java, Jakarta
  • So far and yet so close: Emergent spirituality and the cultural influence of traditional religion among Italian youth.
    Palmisano, Stefania, and Nicola Pannofino (2017)
    Social Compass 64:1: 130-146.

    Based on survey data from Italian youths. Rather than counterposing traditional religion & alternative spiritualities they placed the latter within the framework of the hegemonic Italian Catholicism.

    Associated Search Terms: Spirituality; Catholic, Italy; Young adults; Italy
  • Understanding Young Buddhists. Living Out Ethical Journesys.
    Yip, Andrew K.T., and Sarah-Jane Page (2017)
    Leiden: Brill

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults; Buddhist, Great Britain; Great Britain
  • The positives and negatives of higher education: How the religious context in adolescence moderates the effects of education on changes in religiosity.
    Schwadel, Philip (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:4: 869-885.

    Analyzes National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.) panel data; higher education likely leads to religious decline for mainline Protestants & those with religiously active parents, & increases in religiosity for nones & those where parents attended infrequently.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescence; Education; Family; Panel study; Religiosity; Young adults; Socialization
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-91]  (of 91 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Contextual Database, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    To provide an array of community characteristics by which researchers may investigate the nature of such contextual influences for a wide range of adolescent health behaviors, selected contextual variables have been calculated and compiled. These are provided in this Contextual Database, already linked to the Add Health respondent IDs.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home, In-School, and Parent Questionnaire Data, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included in this dataset are the in-home interviews, in-school questionnaire, and parent questionnaire.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Network Data, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    This network data includes network variables constructed from the Add Health in-school data and friendship nominations.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Grand Sample Weights, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included here are weights to remove any differences between the composition of the sample and the estimated composition of the population. See the attached codebook for information regarding how these weights were calculated.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Contextual Database, Wave II:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    To provide an array of community characteristics by which researchers may investigate the nature of such contextual influences for a wide range of adolescent health behaviors, selected contextual variables have been calculated and compiled. These are provided in this Contextual Database, already linked to the Add Health respondent IDs.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 1/8/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Children and Parenting Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV children and parenting data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Inflammation and Immune Function Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV measures of inflammation and immune function.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Glucose Homeostasis Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV measures of glucose homeostasis.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV in-home questionnaire data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Lipids Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV lipids data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-38]  (of 38 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Investigators)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • FININD from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People differ in their ideas about what it takes for a young person to become an adult these days. How important is it for them to be: financially independent from their parents/guardians?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Extremely important
    2) Quite important
    3) Somewhat important
    4) Not too important
    5) Not at all important
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • OWNHH from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People differ in their ideas about what it takes for a young person to become an adult these days. How important is it for them to be: no longer living in their parents' household?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Extremely important
    2) Quite important
    3) Somewhat important
    4) Not too important
    5) Not at all important
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • EDDONE from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People differ in their ideas about what it takes for a young person to become an adult these days. How important is it for them to be: completed with their formal schooling?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Extremely important
    2) Quite important
    3) Somewhat important
    4) Not too important
    5) Not at all important
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • FTWORK from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People differ in their ideas about what it takes for a young person to become an adult these days. How important is it for them to be: employed full-time?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Extremely important
    2) Quite important
    3) Somewhat important
    4) Not too important
    5) Not at all important
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • SUPFAM from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People differ in their ideas about what it takes for a young person to become an adult these days. How important is it for them to be capable of supporting a family financially?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Extremely important
    2) Quite important
    3) Somewhat important
    4) Not too important
    5) Not at all important
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • HAVCHLD from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People differ in their ideas about what it takes for a young person to become an adult these days. How important is it for them to: have a child?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Extremely important
    2) Quite important
    3) Somewhat important
    4) Not too important
    5) Not at all important
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • GETMAR from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People differ in their ideas about what it takes for a young person to become an adult these days. How important is it for them to: get married?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Extremely important
    2) Quite important
    3) Somewhat important
    4) Not too important
    5) Not at all important
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • PCOLL06 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (pcollege06) Specifically for college students or young adults

    -3) All other missing data
    0) No program of this type mentioned

  • GCOLL98 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (gcollege98) For what purpose or purposes do these groups meet? Specifically for young adults (i.e., age 18+)

    0) No group of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one group of this type

  • GCOLL06 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (gcollege06) For what purpose or purposes do these groups meet? Specifically for young adults (i.e., age 18+)

    0) No group of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one group of this type

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 420 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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