Fellowship of Evangelical Churches Counties (2010) [ Metro Areas | States ]
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The Fellowship of Evangelical Churches grew out of a spiritual awakening among the Amish of Indiana in 1866. Its founder was Bishop Henry Egly. This group adopted the name "The Defenseless Mennonite Church" in 1898, and became known as the Evangelical Mennonite Church in 1948. It took its present name in 2003.

Using data from the 1980-2010 Religious Congregations and Membership Studies, this list ranks U.S. counties on the highest total number of adherents and the highest percent of the population in the Fellowship of Evangelical Churches. You can sort the list by clicking on the column headings.

Congregational "Adherents" include all full members, their children, and others who regularly attend services. "Percent" is the percentage of the total population that belongs to that denomination. Note: Adherents are sometimes residents of a county different than the location of their congregation.

[ More information on the data source ]

Complete List

Ranking County   [Download CSV]AdherentsPercent
9 Adams County, Indiana
176
0.51
12 Allen County, Indiana
1,189
0.33
19 Canyon County, Idaho
111
0.06
13 Cass County, Missouri
314
0.32
19 Champaign County, Illinois
120
0.06
22 Cook County, Illinois
72
0
22 Cuyahoga County, Ohio
57
0
21 Dakota County, Minnesota
163
0.04
22 Fairfield County, Ohio
0
0
22 Franklin County, Ohio
0
0
1 Fulton County, Ohio
1,571
3.68
23 Genesee County, Michigan
--
--
17 Goodhue County, Minnesota
39
0.08
10 Grant County, Indiana
301
0.43
5 Harvey County, Kansas
513
1.48
22 Henry County, Ohio
0
0
22 Kalamazoo County, Michigan
0
0
22 Kennebec County, Maine
0
0
20 Lenawee County, Michigan
45
0.05
23 Livingston County, Illinois
--
--
22 Lorain County, Ohio
0
0
11 Marion County, Missouri
99
0.34
16 McLean County, Illinois
228
0.13
23 Midland County, Michigan
--
--
4 Moniteau County, Missouri
315
2.02
15 Oxford County, Maine
95
0.16
8 Peoria County, Illinois
990
0.53
22 Piatt County, Illinois
0
0
23 Randolph County, Indiana
--
--
23 Reno County, Kansas
--
--
2 Rice County, Kansas
251
2.49
22 Rice County, Minnesota
0
0
7 Steuben County, Indiana
239
0.7
6 Tazewell County, Illinois
1,249
0.92
23 Tippecanoe County, Indiana
--
--
14 Van Buren County, Michigan
174
0.23
23 Wabash County, Indiana
--
--
22 Williams County, Ohio
0
0
18 Wood County, Ohio
93
0.07
3 Woodford County, Illinois
789
2.04


* In an effort to better match the ASARB standards for adherents, a few religious bodies changed the way their adherents were reported in 2010, including Amish groups, Friends groups, Jewish groups, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Non-denominational Christian Churches, and the United Methodist Church. This change does not affect any of the data in the newly released 2010 U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations & Membership Study. In fact, the data for these groups are now more comparable to that of other bodies than it was in previous decadal reports.

However, the change in methodology can distort assessments on growth or decline between 2000 and 2010 for each of these groups. County-level 2000 data using the new methodology are not readily available. ASARB staff has adjusted some 2000 county-level adherent statistics to allow for a more accurate picture on growth or decline. The revised maps and charts are now available on-line at www.usreligioncensus.org for those who are interested in these trends.

Source

2010 data were collected by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB) and include statistics for 236 religious groups, providing information on the number of their congregations and adherents within each state and county in the United States. Clifford Grammich, Kirk Hadaway, Richard Houseal, Dale E. Jones, Alexei Krindatch, Richie Stanley and Richard H. Taylor supervised the collection. These data originally appeared in 2010 U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations & Membership Study, published by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB). [More information on the data collection]