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Recent Additions

National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, 2012, and 2018-2019) (Uploaded: 10/16/2020)

The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations. Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the 1998 NCS data was the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. Subsequent NCS waves were conducted in 2006-07, 2012, and 2018-19. The 2006-07 NCS sample includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. The 2012 NCS includes an oversample of Hispanic congregations. The 2018-19 NCS includes a subset of congregations that also were interviewed in 2012.

The NCS Wave I-II Panel Dataset is also available from the ARDA. The Wave III-IV Panel Dataset will be available soon.

National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, 2012, and 2018-2019) - Instructional Dataset (Uploaded: 10/16/2020)

This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories and added as additional variables to the file.

The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations. Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the 1998 NCS data was the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. Subsequent NCS waves were conducted in 2006-07, 2012, and 2018-19. The 2006-07 NCS sample includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. The 2012 NCS includes an oversample of Hispanic congregations. The 2018-19 NCS includes a subset of congregations that also were interviewed in 2012.

The NCS Wave I-II Panel Dataset is also available from the ARDA. The Wave III-IV Panel Dataset will be available soon.

National Religion and Spirituality Survey 2020 (Uploaded: 9/22/2020)

A Study of Spirituality in the United States 2020 was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago on behalf of the Fetzer Institute and Hattaway Communications. This survey brings people's spiritual lives to light, focusing on how Americans' spirituality may inform their prosocial and civic behaviors. It also includes a focus is on how people identify as spiritual and religious and the perceived differences and similarities between the two identities.

Spatial Analysis of Contemporary Religious Diversity in Ukraine (SACRED -- Ukraine), 1991-2015 (Uploaded: 8/24/2020)

After the fall of the USSR in 1991, Ukraine became fertile ground for empirical research on religious diversity. Over the past 30 years, several examples illustrate the growing religious pluralism in Ukraine. These include the strong presence of all major Christian denominations (Orthodox, Greek-Catholic, Roman-Catholic and Protestant), the solid influence of the Greek-Catholic church in Western Ukraine, a persisting Baptist presence since the 19th century (i.e., serving as the base for transnational evangelical missions to post-Soviet republics), the rise and growth of Muslim and Jewish communities and the split of the Orthodox church into three independent jurisdictions: the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Moscow Patriarchate (UOC-MP), the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Kyivan Patriarchate (UOC-KP), and the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church (UAOC). Moreover, in 2019, the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople signed the Tomos, officially recognizing a new Orthodox Church of Ukraine as a canonical autocephalous Orthodox Church within the territory of Ukraine.

The goal of this dataset is to map the 30 years of religious resurgence in Ukraine after the fall of the USSR. By measuring and tracking religious supply, this project aims to contribute to the global discussion about its role and state in shaping religious behavior and attitudes of people. Religious supply is also deeply embedded in the history of the Soviet and post-Soviet era; since 2015, religion is associated with political solidarity and international affairs.

SACRED-Ukraine includes two files:
1) Religious communities 1991-2015
2) Religious communities 1991-2018
The following dataset attached is the first file. See Spatial Analysis of Contemporary Religious Diversity in Ukraine (SACRED -- Ukraine), 1991-2018 for the second dataset.

Spatial Analysis of Contemporary Religious Diversity in Ukraine (SACRED -- Ukraine), 1991-2018 (Uploaded: 8/24/2020)

After the fall of the USSR in 1991, Ukraine became fertile ground for empirical research on religious diversity. Over the past 30 years, several examples illustrate the growing religious pluralism in Ukraine. These include the strong presence of all major Christian denominations (Orthodox, Greek-Catholic, Roman-Catholic and Protestant), the solid influence of the Greek-Catholic church in Western Ukraine, a persisting Baptist presence since the 19th century (i.e., serving as the base for transnational evangelical missions to post-Soviet republics), the rise and growth of Muslim and Jewish communities and the split of the Orthodox church into three independent jurisdictions: the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Moscow Patriarchate (UOC-MP), the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Kyivan Patriarchate (UOC-KP), and the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church (UAOC). Moreover, in 2019, the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople signed the Tomos, officially recognizing a new Orthodox Church of Ukraine as a canonical autocephalous Orthodox Church within the territory of Ukraine.

The goal of this dataset is to map the 30 years of religious resurgence in Ukraine after the fall of the USSR. By measuring and tracking religious supply, this project aims to contribute to the global discussion about its role and state in shaping religious behavior and attitudes of people. Religious supply is also deeply embedded in the history of the Soviet and post-Soviet era; since 2015, religion is associated with political solidarity and international affairs.

SACRED-Ukraine includes two files:
1) Religious communities 1991-2015
2) Religious communities 1991-2018
The following dataset attached is the second file. See Spatial Analysis of Contemporary Religious Diversity in Ukraine (SACRED -- Ukraine), 1991-2015 for the first dataset.

American Protestant Mission Agencies Profiles, 2016 2.0 (Uploaded: 8/24/2020)

The Mission Handbook is a catalog of North American Protestant mission agencies that maintain international ministries and has been published in 22 editions from 1953 to 2017 (Dayton 1976; Missionary Research Library 1953, 1956, 1958, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1966; Missionary Research Library and Missions Advanced Research and Communication Center 1968, 1970; Missions Advanced Research and Communication Center 1973; Newell 2017; Roberts and Siewert 1989; Siewert 1995; Siewert and Kenyon 1993; Siewert and Valdez 1997; Siewert and Welliver 2000; Weber 2010; Weber and Welliver 2007; Welliver and Northcutt 2004; Wilson 1979; Wilson and Siewert 1986). Variables were constructed from key data across these editions. Two separate datasets were constructed with these variables. The first, 'American Protestant Mission Agencies Profiles, Full 2.0,' covers all 22 editions, prioritizing those data that were the most consistent across all 22 editions. The second, 'American Protestant Mission Agencies Profiles, 2016 2.0' (this one) only focuses on data from the most recent 22nd edition, and includes additional variables.

American Protestant Mission Agencies Profiles, Full 2.0 (Uploaded: 8/24/2020)

The Mission Handbook is a catalog of North American Protestant mission agencies that maintain international ministries and has been published in 22 editions from 1953 to 2017 (Dayton 1976; Missionary Research Library 1953, 1956, 1958, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1966; Missionary Research Library and Missions Advanced Research and Communication Center 1968, 1970; Missions Advanced Research and Communication Center 1973; Newell 2017; Roberts and Siewert 1989; Siewert 1995; Siewert and Kenyon 1993; Siewert and Valdez 1997; Siewert and Welliver 2000; Weber 2010; Weber and Welliver 2007; Welliver and Northcutt 2004; Wilson 1979; Wilson and Siewert 1986). Variables were constructed from key data across these editions. Two separate datasets were constructed with these variables. The first, 'American Protestant Mission Agencies Profiles, Full 2.0,' (this one) covers all 22 editions, prioritizing those data that were the most consistent across all 22 editions. The second, 'American Protestant Mission Agencies Profiles, 2016 2.0' only focuses on data from the most recent 22nd edition, and includes additional variables.

Religious Characteristics of States Data Project: Chief Executives' Religions, v. 1.0 (RCS-CER 1.0), COUNTRIES ONLY (Uploaded: 8/24/2020)

The Religious Characteristics of States Dataset (RCS) was created to fulfill the unmet need for a dataset on the religious dimensions of countries of the world, with the state-year as the unit of observation. The third phase, Chief Executives' Religions, provides data on religious affiliations of countries' 'chief executives,' i.e., their presidents, prime ministers, or other heads of state/government exercising largely real, not ceremonial, political power. The dataset, like others in the RCS data project, is designed expressly for easy merger with datasets of the Correlates of War and Polity projects, datasets by the United Nations, the Religion And State datasets by Jonathan Fox, and the ARDA national profiles.

Religious Characteristics of States Data Project: Chief Executives' Religions, v. 1.0 (RCS-CER 1.0), INDIVIDUALS ONLY (Uploaded: 8/24/2020)

The Religious Characteristics of States Dataset (RCS) was created to fulfill the unmet need for a dataset on the religious dimensions of countries of the world, with the state-year as the unit of observation. The third phase, Chief Executives' Religions, provides data on religious affiliations of countries' 'chief executives,' i.e., their presidents, prime ministers, or other heads of state/government exercising largely real, not ceremonial, political power. The dataset, like others in the RCS data project, is designed expressly for easy merger with datasets of the Correlates of War and Polity projects, datasets by the United Nations, the Religion And State datasets by Jonathan Fox, and the ARDA national profiles.

Project Canada 2005 (Uploaded: 7/24/2020)

The 2005 survey was the seventh in the Project Canada national adult surveys. It was carried out by mail between approximately July 15 and December 15 of 2005. Reginald W. Bibby was the principal investigator, assisted by Project Manager Reggie Gordon Bibby, Jr., Jim Savoy, and a number of student research assistants. The initial Project Canada 2005 sampling frame consisted of a list of 1,729 people who had participated in one or more of the six previous Project Canada adult surveys (1975 through 2000). Previous experiences suggested that as many as 50 percent of these individuals (about 900) would participate once again. To produce an eventual participating sample of at least 1,500 cases, this core was supplemented with an initial new sample of some 1,500 people and a projected 500 participants, resulting in a total 2005 sample of around 1,500 people. In addition, to facilitate comparisons with Alberta in the province's centennial year, Alberta was oversampled to bring its total to around 600 people - permitting generalizations within about +/- four points, 19 times in 20. This involved adding about 400 people beyond the 232 Albertans who had participated in Project Canada 2000 and selecting some 1200 additional people from the province. Our projections were reasonably accurate: the total number of 2005 participants consisted of 2,400 people, including 655 Albertans. With oversampling compressed, the Alberta sample is an appropriate 160 (10 percent), and the total national sample 1,600.

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